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Monthly Archives: March 2017

Antarctic cruise special offers

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The Antarctic is a truly amazing place, a wilderness of pristine icebergs, glistening waterways, waddling penguins, and fluking whales. The season runs between November and March and with places limited, if you plan to go, it’s best to secure your place early with a deposit. If you’re still not quite sure, here’s several early bird special offers to help you make your decision.

Cruise Date Days Special Offer
Falklands & South Georgia 20/10 – 7/11 19 $1,000 off
South Georgia In Depth 21/10 – 4/11 15 $750 travel credit
Antarctic Peninsula – Basecamp Ortelius 4/11 – 15/11 12 Includes free activities
South Georgia In Depth 4/11 – 18/11 15 $750 travel credit
Falklands , South Georgia & Antarctica 6/11 – 25/11 20 Up to $4,000 off
Weddell Sea – In search of the Emperor Penguin 15/11 – 25/11 11 Up to €1,200 off
Falkland Islands – South Georgia – Antarctic Peninsula 29/11- 18/12 20 Up to €1,100 off
Antarctic Peninsula Explorer 4/12 – 14/12 11 $750 travel credit
Antarctic Peninsula with South Shetland Islands 6/12 – 16/12 11 Up to €850 off
Antarctic Peninsula with South Shetland Islands 6/12 – 16/12 11 Up to €850 off
Antarctic Peninsula 14/12 – 25/12 12 $1,000 off
Antarctic Peninsula Adventure 3/3 – 13/3 11 $750 travel credit
Marine Mammals of Antarctica 23/3 – 2/4 11 $750 travel credit

To discuss your Antarctic travel plans or book your cruise, contact one of our experts at +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or message us here.

5 amazing places you’ll visit on an Antarctic cruise

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Antarctica, the last true wilderness on the planet. A vast, unspoiled continent that has been inspiring adventurers for hundreds of years. Access to parts of the Antarctic have become much easier in recent years and unlike Shackleton’s exploration, it can be done so in relevant comfort. Here’s 5 amazing regions you’re likely to visit on an Antarctic cruise.

Ushuaia & Tierra del Fuego

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Ushuaia is referred to as ‘The End of the World’ and though it feels like it, it’s the starting point for almost all expeditions to the white continent. Surrounding the most southerly town in the world are snowcapped mountains and the Beagle Channel. While most people land in the town and head straight off, it’s worth taking some time to explore. Hike along the trails with local guides, go trout fishing in the lakes, horse ride and take cross country skiing tours. The Tierra del Fuego National Park is home to much wildlife and is breathtaking.

Weddell Sea & Snow Hill

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The Weddell sea is a truly extraordinary place. To visit, one must travel on board an ice-breaker vessel which cuts through thick ice floes. This is a place where few have been before. Snow Hill is home to one of the only emperor penguin rookeries. Some vessels have helicopters to help you get a bird’s eye view and land nearby to walk among the colony. Here, the male penguins have survived the winter with little food while keeping the eggs of their young warm below their feet. An awesome site. Out at sea, Weddell seals can be seen basking on the chunks of floating ice or diving into the water in search of their next meal.

South Georgia

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Many of the Antarctic expeditions visit South Georgia, a place perhaps best known as the resting place or the explorer Shackleton. What fewer know is South Georgia is one of the most awe inspiring places on the planet. Rich with wildlife, thousands of penguins can be found along the Salisbury Plain while many more Gentoo penguins and huge elephant seals take up the beach along Gold Harbour. It’s also an excellent place for seeing wandering albatrosses and fur seals. Though the waters nearby can be rough, it’s sometimes possible to visit Elephant Island where Shackleton’s crew were stranded all those years ago.

Falkland Islands

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Another common stop off point on the way to the Antarctic, and for good reason. The Falkland Islands, located around 300 miles east of South America, is home to much wildlife. Similar to the windswept islands of Scotland, there are more than 200 recorded species of birds on the archipelago. Magellan and  Gentoo penguins on Carcass Island, and rockhoppers, blue-eyed shags and black-browed albatrosses nest on West Point. The islands are the perfect breeding ground for elephant and fur seals who crowd the beaches.

Antarctic Peninsula and Circle

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One of the most magically moments for most is the first sightings of icebergs during the approach to the Antarctic Peninsula. The huge towering monoliths of all shapes and sizes slowly float past before waterways and mountains surround the vessel from all sides. An expedition is likely to take you down Antarctic Sound (sometimes called Iceberg Alley) and through the stunning Lemaire Channel.  Look out for leopard and crabeater seals basking in the soon and humpback and minke whales fluking near the ship.

The next Antarctic expedition season starts in November 2017, but the limited spaces get booked up fast. To start planning your once-in-a-lifetime cruise to the white continent, contact one of our experts at +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or send us a message.

5 cable cars to take in South America

Cable cars are, in our opinion, one of the best modes of transport. Quick, no traffic and it’s possible to take in the landscape or city from above. Many of the cities located along the Andes are, unsurprisingly, hilly, making transport difficult. Though some cable cars are being used for tourism, others are transforming parts of Latin American cities by making the areas more accessible.

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

South America’s most well-known and oldest is Rio de Janeiro’s Sugarloaf Mountain cable car. Built in the early 20th century, it was designed for tourists to take in the city views from the mountain’s summit. The journey takes just a few minutes to reach the top.

La Paz, Bolivia

Flickr: Inhabitat

Flickr: Inhabitat

The highly successful state-run cable car that connects La Paz with El Alto is the highest in the world. Since its inauguration in 2014, millions of tourists and locals have used the cable car which costs just £0.25. The line can reportedly carry a staggering 18,000 people per hour. During the World Cup, some of the cars were painted to look like footballs.

Santiago, Chile

Flickr: Robert Cutts

Flickr: Robert Cutts

The Teleférico Metropolitano was built in 1980, but has since been refurbished and reopened late last year. It takes tourists and locals up to the huge Metropolitan Park, one of the largest in Chile. Some of the cabins have been adapted to fit bikes, a popular sport in the park.

Medellín, Colombia

Another highly successful transport system, the Medellín Metrocable opened almost fifteen years ago, and has helped to connect the cities hilly districts. More lines have since been added, the latest being in 2016.  The city one an award for innovation in 2012.

Quito, Ecuador

Flickr: Stuart King

Flickr: Stuart King

The Quito Teleférico hasn’t been created as a mode of transport to get around the city. The cable car starts are 2,950 metres above sea level and arrives in the heady heights of Cruz Loma at 4,050 metres. Fantastic views over the city and the adjacent Pichincha Volcano can be seen from the top. It’s also possible to spot Antisana, Cotopaxi and Rumiñahui on clear days.

If you’d like to take any of the cable cars in South America, or visit anywhere else on the continent, speak to one of our travel experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478.

Lonesome George returns home

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Almost five years after the death of Lonesome George, the last Pinta tortoise has returned back home to the Galapagos Islands. He remains were sent to New York in 2012 to be preserved by taxidermists and was exhibited at the American Museum of Natural History in 2014.

For those who don’t know Lonesome George, he was the last survivor of the Pinta Islands sub-species. He was found on Pinta Island alone in 1972 when most believed that his species was extinct. After being brought to the Charles Darwin Research Station in Puerto Ayora, there were efforts by the park to mate him with female tortoises, but unfortunately this was unsuccessful. At the point of death, his age was unknown, but is thought to be well over 100 years old. He was the star of the show at the research station and during the 40 years he lived there, tens of thousands of tourists visited him.

The Ecuadorian Pacific archipelago is famous as the place that Charles Darwin developed his theory of evolution. There are 15 species of giant tortoise that inhabit the islands, three of which are now extinct, including George’s sub-species.

The expertly preserved body arrived back on Puerto Ayora on an Ecuadorian military plane and is now on display at the park. Would you like to see Lonesome George or the other wildlife on the Galapagos? Call to speak with one of our travel experts today on +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or see our sample Galapagos tours here.

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