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Category Archives: Argentina

Argentina’s guitar-shaped forest

It’s little known about and rarely visited, but in the heart of Argentina’s Pampas is a guitar-shaped forest created from thousands of eucalyptus and cypress trees complete with a long neck, strings and the curve of the instrument’s body. It stretches for almost a mile and is easily spotted along the fertile farming land by passing planes and can be seen from Google’s satellite maps.

This isn’t a coincidence and the story behind it is rather touching. It was created by local farmer Pedro Martin Ureta and his children who planted the trees more than 4 decades ago to commemorate his beloved wife. During the ‘70s, the couple were taking a flight over the Pampa when his wife Graciela Yraizoz pointed to a piece of farmland that looked like a milking pail and suggested they create a better one, perhaps a guitar.

Unfortunately, in 1977, she sadly passed away at the age of 25 along with their fifth unborn child after suffering from a ruptured aneurysm. Several years later, Pedro decided to create the guitar as a way of honouring her life. Along with his 4 children, he set off to plant more than 7,000 trees, first starting with the guitar’s body, then moving in to plant a star-shaped hole and long rows of blue eucalyptus trees as the strings that run along its neck. Over the years, he’s worked tirelessly to cultivate the plants and it’s only recently that they have matured enough to finally see his lost wife’s dream become a reality.

Pedro has admitted that he’s only every seen photos of the site from above as a fear of flying has stopped him taking a flight over it.

Ready to start planning your trip to Argentina? Get in contact with one of our travel experts on +44 (0) 207 1478 or email us here.

Go underground to this fascinating subterranean Buenos Aires museum

Planning a break in Argentina’s capital, Buenos Aires? You’ll find plenty of information about the city’s iconic landmarks but there’s very little on the El Zanjón de Granados museum.  A place with mysterious subterranean passageways. Over 30 years ago local resident Jorge Eckstein purchased a crumbling mansion in the historic San Telmo district. He planned to turn it into a glittering new restaurant but had no idea he was about to stumble on one of the city’s most mysterious archaeological sites. During the renovations, he noticed something strange about the foundations and one of the patio began to sink. As they dismantled the flooring, they discovered a portal leading to a subterranean labyrinth. Legends existed about underground tunnels below Buenos Aires, but they remained a myth. Archaeologists came to investigate, and the dig led to the discovery of more than 2 kilometres of vaulted brick passageways.

They concluded they were a drainage tunnel from the 18th century, or they were part of a much larger network created a century earlier by Jesuits. These priests whose unpopularity in the city led them to create escape routes out of the city. This is hard to prove as many of the tunnels disappeared during the construction boom in the second half of the 20th century. It took 17 years to excavate the site with more than 150 truckloads debris removed from the tunnels. During the dig, a hoard of artefacts appeared from around the world: historic coins, English china, old French tiles and several African pipes.

Today, the site is an underground museum and many of the items found are on display. You can wander below Buenos Aires’ street level to find a series of tunnels that led into courtyards and rooms including a slave cell. The fascinating museum tells the story of the history and its later discovery through a century of photos. The best way to experience the museum is on one of the daily 1-hour tours where guides take you on a journey though the passageways.

If you’re looking for something a little different that Buenos Aires’ more famous landmarks, El Zanjón de Granados provides a unique glimpse into the city’s extraordinary past..

Ready to start planning your adventure to Buenos Aires and Argentina? Get in touch with one of our South American experts on +44 (0) 207 1478 or email us here and we’ll help you create a bespoke one-off trip built around your tastes and budget.

The most luxurious things to do in Latin America

Those lucky few with deep pockets can experience Latin America in extraordinary ways. And why not? There’s been plenty of studies that show that experiences making you happier than things. So, if you are a big spender, why not book up one of these unique things to do.

Grab a drink at the Copacabana Palace

Copacabana Palace in Rio has seen many of the world’s rich and famous walk through its Art Deco doors. The hotel opened in the early ‘20s. Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers danced here and the Rolling Stones band had a drink at the Grand Salon before their concert on the beach. Magnificent guestrooms overlook the famous strip of golden sand. They drip with antique furnishings and original artwork. Be sure to swing by the uber-cool Bar do Copa where the city’s trend-setters come for sun-downers.

Take a tour of the Uyuni Salt Flats in a private air stream

While the crowds head out onto the Uyuni Salt Flats on 4x4s, why not book a tour of the iconic natural wonder on the only vintage Airstream in Bolivia. This shiny, metal campervan includes a bedroom area, living space and bathroom with hot shower. You’ll attended by a personal chef, a support vehicle and guide who’ll help you make the most of your time there. The best part is enjoying dinner below the starry night sky.

Cruise the Galapagos on board the Grace

If you want to see the Galapagos in style, there’s no better way than on board the Grace. Named after its former owner Grace Kelly,  the motor yacht has everything you’d expect that’s fit for a princess. Available for private bookings for up to 18 passengers and attended by 2 naturalist guides and 10 crew. On board, you’ll find a spacious sundeck, a Jacuzzi and buffet-style dining. The vessel has seen a long list of famous passengers including Winston Churchill, Aristotle Onassis and Sir George Tilley.

Swim with whale sharks off Holbox Island

To enjoy the ultimate underwater experience, head to the tiny island of Holbox just off the coast of Mexico’s Yucatan peninsula. Here, you can book a private tour between May and September to snorkel with whale sharks. These gentle behemoths of the sea can reach up to 15 metres in length and more than 15 tons making them the biggest fish in the seas. There are few things that match up to the once-and-a-lifetime experience of swimming with these harmless beasts of the sea.

Ride the Andean Explorer sleeper train

The Belmond Andean Explorer is the first luxury sleeper train in South America. It provides a unique way to get up close to the mountainous scenery in absolute comfort. The train plies the tracks between Cuzco and Lake Titicaca on a 2 or 3-day overnight adventure. You’ll find deluxe double cabins with panoramic windows, an en suite bathroom and living area. You can mingle with your fellow guests in the Piano Bar lounge car. Sip cocktails and enjoy live music to go with the Andean views. Taste seasonal Peruvian flavours in the luxury dining car or enjoy a treatment and massage in the on-board spa.

Fly over Rio de Janeiro

Avoid the throngs of tourists on the beach or around Christ the Redeemer, see it all from above from one of the private helicopter flights over the city. After boarding, you’ll be flown over the beaches, circle the iconic statue and enjoy views of Sugarloaf Mountain and Tijuca Forest from high up. A guide accompanies you to help spot the city’s landmarks and the flight lasts anywhere from 15 minutes to an hour. An incredible way to see the city from a unique perspective.

Catch a glimpse of Machu Picchu after the crowds have disappeared

In Peru it’s unthinkable not to visit the ancient Inka ruins of Machu Picchu that lies perched on the top of a mountain near Cuzco. That said, there are more than 5,000 people that mill around the site every day. If you want to splurge, book a night at the luxurious Sanctuary Lodge next to the citadel. From your private guestroom terrace, you’ll be able to look over the ruins, when the crowds have all disappeared.

Cruise along the Amazon on the luxury Aria

Want to experience the Amazon without sticky, humid nights in basic lodging? Try one of the 3, 4 or 7-night cruises on board the state-of-the-art Aria. The 45-metre long boat, designed by celebrated Peruvian architect Jordi Puig, includes 16 glass-fronted suites. Enjoy gourmet Peruvian cuisine in the dining room.  Spot Amazonian wildlife from the observation deck. At night the myriad stars. Dedicated naturalist guides, private chefs and crew will ensure a comfortable adventure.

Ready to start your luxury getaway to South America? Call one of our travel experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or email here to start planning.

Latin America’s top football teams

boca juniors

Flickr: Sam Kelly

The beautiful game is by far the biggest sport in Latin America, nearing an obsession for many. Even if you’re not a fan of the sport, you’d be hard pressed not to enjoy the lively atmosphere. Try a match between some of the biggest rivals like Buenos Aires’ River Plate and Boca Juniors. Though the teams haven’t got the spending power of European clubs, managers keep an eye out for new talent. So, if you’re looking for a new club to support in the new world, here’s our list of the best there is.

River Plate, Buenos Aires

Let’s start with two of the biggest and well known. The Buenos Aires team River Plate has gained a serious following despite, a recent run of bad luck. They’ve notched-up 36 titles and two Libertadores Cups under their belt. Many of River Plate’s top players get nabbed by European teams.

Boca Juniors, Buenos Aires

The fierce Buenos Aires rivals of River Plate are the Boca Juniors who, over the years, have nurtured a wealth of talent and be named one of the top Latin America clubs of the 21st century. They’ve had similar success with River Plate with 30 titles and four Libertadores. Heard of Maradona? This was his team.

Corinthians, Sao Paulo

Sao Paulo’s Corinthians have gained a serious reputation. With a star-studded list of players over the years, they are Brazil’s largest club. Over the years have bagged a ton of titles including 5 Brasileiraos, a Libertador and even a FIFA World Cup when they beat the UK’s Chelsea. This is a club to look out for.

Penarol, Montevideo

Without a doubt, Penarol is Uruguay’s most followed and successful club. Located on the outskirts of Montevideo, this team have scored enough to gain almost 50 league titles and several Libertadores. The club has produced top players over the years and contributed to all Uruguay’s World Cup teams. Though they haven’t won a cup since the ’80’s, they are still a force to be reckoned with.

Santos FC, Santos

Santos FC needs little introduction. This historic Brazilian club has set the football world on fire with the likes of Pele and Robinho. Pele is often considered the greatest player of all time. More recently, it was Neymar’s club before he moved on to play for Barcelona. If you’re looking to support a Brazilian club with pedigree, look no further than Santos.

Atletico Nacional, Medellín

Atletico Nacional, based in Colombia’s city of Medellin, are having a good run, bagging plenty of league titles over the last 10 years. They’re becoming the powerhouse not just in Colombia, but the whole of Latin America. The most famous player to come out of the club is Rene Higuita, a goalkeeper known for his unique style.

Colo-Colo, Santiago

Let’s face it, Colo-Colo is Chile’s most successful team. They’ve many cups and a Libertadores under their belt. Famed for producing players with a fast and offensive style; the big European clubs keep an eye of for talent.

Olimpia, Asunción

Olimpia continues to do well with almost 40 league titles among other cups. It’s best known for bagging the Intercontinental Cup, the Copa Interamerica, the Libertadore and the League Title all in 1979, the peak year for the club. A good solid team with a strong history and one to keep an eye on.

Want to go and watch the beautiful game in Latin America? Call one of our experts on +44 (0) 207 1478 or email us here to start planning your adventure.

Where to watch Latin America’s famously melting sunset

Who doesn’t like a good sunset? One of life’s great joys is watching the melting ball of orange light dropping behind the horizon, while colouring the sky. Whether you are on a honeymoon or on a romantic getaway, be sure to not miss one of these sunset places. In Latin America they don’t all revolve around the beach and sea, it could be desert or mountain.

Valley of the Moon, San Pedro de Atacama

This spectacular lunar-like landscape lies in the Atacama Desert of northern Chile. Towering red rock formations would look more at home on the surface of Mars than they do in Latin America. Scamper up to the viewpoint at the end of the afternoon to enjoy a special sunset. As the sun drops down behind the arid scenery, the rock colours transform.

Tamarindo, Guanacaste

Tamarindo

Flickr: Duane Storey

We mentioned that few of these spots are beaches, but we’re making an exception with Tamarindo. This surf town and strip of sand overlooks the Pacific on Costa Rica’s western coast. Ideal honeymoon territory. Spend you days swimming, snorkelling or wildlife watching before taking your seat on the powdery sand. Watch the sun setting over the ocean’s horizon, a picture-perfect sight. Spend the evening with travellers splashing around in the sea.

Machu Picchu, Cuzco

Machu Picchu

Flickr: Todd Gehman

If you’ve got deep pockets, spend a night at the Sanctuary Lodge, the only hotel next to the Inca ruins of Machu Picchu. When the throngs of crowds have all, you’ll have the perfect uninterrupted view of the sun setting over the citadel from your private terrace. A completely different way to experience one of the New 7 Wonders of the World.

The Galapagos, Ecuador

galapagos sunset

Flickr: Steve

The Galapagos Islands are famous for wildlife, but few mention the spectacular sunsets. If you take a cruise around the islands it can be tiring spotting the archipelago’s animals. At the end of the day, enjoy a glass of something fizzy and some mouth-watering food, with the sun setting behind the ocean horizon. Then argue with fellow traveller’s if you’ve seen the ‘green flash’.

Sugarloaf Mountain, Rio de Janeiro

Sugarloaf Mountain

Flickr: duncan c

Climb Rio’s Sugarloaf Mountain to take in the spectacular views across the bays but be sure to stay up there until the late afternoon. There are few places on earth that measure up to watching the sun setting over the Marvellous City. Lights twinkle among forested mountain scenery, spot the towering Christ de Redeemer. Just perfect.

The Salt Flats, Uyuni

The Uyuni Salt Flats lie on the high plateau of Bolivia are one of the world’s great natural wonders. A vast expanse of snow-white salt broken only be the odd cacti-laden island. Stay in one of the unique salt hotels out in the wilderness. Here you’ll witness the sight of the sunset’s light bouncing off the salty crust. Ready your camera, you’re not going to want to miss snapping this.

To start planning your honeymoon or romantic break in Latin America, call on of our experts on +44 (0) 207 1478 or email us here.

Slang phrases you should know before you visit Argentina

Think you’ve got fluent Spanish down? When you land in Buenos Aires, you’ll find how much different the street language is. Rioplatense is an intriguing mix of Spanish and Italian (due to the big influx of Italians immigrants). Puzzle over the hand gestures thrown in for good measure. If you’re going to impress the locals, have a go at picking up some of these useful phrases. You’re not going to learn these in any Spanish class back home.

Lunfardo, the name for Argentine street slang, was born in the early 20th century. At that time the lower classes adapted words to keep their shady dealings secret. Over the years, the language started to permeate all walks of life, in part due to its use in tango and art. Today the slang is thriving and has spread across to Uruguay and even as far afield as Chile and Paraguay.

In Lunfardo, many of the words’ syllables have their order reversed thereby changing their meaning. The perfect example of this is “hotel” which changed to “telo” refers to one of the seedy pay-by-the-hours motels. When you swing into a coffee house, instead of asking for a “café”, try saying “feca” instead and check out the server’s reaction.

Try these words when you’re on the streets of Buenos Aires

“Che” – an informal way of saying hello and used daily. A good one to start with.

“Boludo” – a little like “man” or “dude”, use sparingly with friends and people you know. Try “Che boludo”.

“Como andas?” – Translates to “how’s it going?”

“Birra” – a mighty useful one to pick up instead of these classic “ceveza”.

“Boliche” – you’ll likely hear the sounds of chuckling if you use “discoteca”, around these parts, it’s considered a little geeky.

“Porteño/a” – a name used to describe the people of Buenos Aires.

“Plata” –  you might know money as “dinero”, but in Argentina, it’s “plata”, best used as “no tengo plata”.

“Chino” – though it might not sound PC, it’s acceptable to call a shop a “Chino” in Buenos Aires, a reference to the number of Chinese immigrants who own stores.

“La posta” – if something’s “la posta”, it’s the best of the best.

“Copado” – the coolest way to say cool in Argentina.

“Gordo/a” – you won’t get looked at funny if you called your partner “gordo/a” meaning fatty, it’s a charming way to greet them.

“Barbaro” – if you use this handy word, you’re referring to something awesome.

“Quilombo” – use when you’re in a real sticky situation, a complete mess. Hopefully, you’ll never have to utter this one!

“Mala muerte” –  translating to “bad death”, you’d use this phrase if you want to describe somewhere awful.

“Un montón” –  commonly used to describe a lot of something.

Want to practice your lunfardo on the streets of Buenos Aires? Get in touch with one of our travel experts on +44 (0) 207 1478 or email us here to start planning your adventure.

The highest climbable mountains in South America

The Andes runs all along the spine of South America. Stretching from Colombia in the tropical north to Patagonia in the windswept south. The towering snow-capped peaks offer some of the most thrilling climbs on earth. Here’s a rundown of the highest climbable mountains on the continent. Be warned, these are not for the faint-hearted. You’ll need stamina, endurance, experience, the right gear and an awful lot of training before you take on one of these behemoths. If you’re looking for something a little lighter, but as scenic, look at our favourite Latin America hikes right here.

Huantsan, Peru

Huatsan

Flickr: ydylg

Huantsan, is a 6,400-metre-high rarely climbed, beast in Peru’s Cordillera Blanca. Those who make the effort will enjoy one of the world’s most incredible views over the rest of the snow-capped Andes. Make sure you’ve kitted up, got plenty of local advice and prepare yourself physically and mentally for this one, you’re going to need it.

Central Tower, Chile

Patagonia’s Torres del Paine are world-famous granite monoliths. Carved out by the ice the Towers has attracted famous climbers like Chris Bonnington and Don Whillans. Though the altitude is not so high as at 2,460 meters, the almost vertical granite rock face is more challenging. It’s not just mountaineering, you’ll need a range of climbing skills to scale this beautiful beast. The surrounding scenery is stunning and popular for trekking.

Chacraraju, Peru

Chacraraju sits in Peru’s Cordillera Blanca. This undisputed champion of climbs is one of the most tough of the six-thousanders. Expect rocky climbs, icy crevasses and weather than can change at the drop of a hat. All the routes take several days and involve hanging bivouacs. When you reach the summit at 6,100m, you’ll realize it was worth every minute.

Aconcagua, Argentina

The highest peak in South America, Aconcagua towers a fraction short of 7,000 metres. Aconcagua is the highest non-technical mountain in the world. It is also the highest spot in the Americas. The main problems are lack of oxygen and bad weather. If you’re lucky enough to reach the top it won’t just be the thin air that will take your breath away, the views are astounding.

Yerupajá, Peru

The second highest mountain in Peru is not for the faint hearted. Some attempt the long climb and, few make successful ascents. The only way to access the summit is via a razor-thin ridge, a tricky manoeuvre before you reach your goal. Expect near-vertical climbs and plenty of ice on this dangerous 6,600-metre climb. The summit is the highest point in the Amazon River watershed.

Fitz Roy, Argentina

Fitz Roy is a mountain peak in the Southern Patagonia icefield. The foothills provide some beautiful trekking around meandering trails. Climbers looking to satisfy their thrill-seeking itch will need to look up to its granite summit. It might not be so high, stretching up 3,375m, but it’s a toughie. Those who have completed it often say it’s also one of the most rewarding climbs.

Ready to go trekking in South America? Get in touch with one of our Latin America experts today on +44 (0) 207 1478 or email us here to start planning your adventure in the mountains.

Latin America’s culinary capitals

Calling all foodies. More travellers are picking their holiday spots based on gastronomy than ever before. Latin America boasts some of the world’s culinary capitals, such as Lima. The Peruvian capital is at the epicentre of Peru’s thriving food scene. Whether it’s the diverse landscapes or the varied people and cultures, Latin America is doing something right when it comes to cuisine. If you don’t know your completo from your choripan, you’ve come to the right place. From years of Latin American food exploration, we’ve compiled a handy list of the gastronomic hotspots.

Mexico City, Mexico

mexico city food

Flickr: The DLC

While Oaxaca is often tipped as the centre of Mexico’s most complex food, they’re pipped to the post by the metropolis of Mexico City. Its streets are brimming with foods from all corners of this magnificent country. The sights and smells are almost intoxicating and can’t fail to get you salivating. While not all street food is equal, it’s hard to find one that’s bad. Grab a pew at any humble taco stand and tuck into tortillas topped with juicy grilled meat, queso blanco and spicy salsas. If you’ve got an accompanying cold beer, all the better.

Cartagena, Colombia

When you look around online, you’ll find eager bloggers waxing lyrical about Cartagena’s colourful streets and people, and it’s true that this coastal city is a little gem. However, few mention how good the food is here. It’s teeming with good restaurants serving up fresh seafood and cafes knocking out humble (but delicious fare), but it’s the street food where the city really shines. Wander into almost any plaza or cobbled street and you’ll find vendors plying everything from cornbread arepas and grilled meats over coal to Colombia-style ceviche.

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

Brazilian food is fusion food, a lip-smacking blend of Italian, African and indigenous. Expert hearty stews, pasta dishes, seafood soups and crispy salgados. Rio’s Carioca’s know how to live the good life, with weekends spent on the sun-drenched sand, cooling off in the ocean and pauses to munch on tasty treats. Try one of the waterfront restaurants, bag a cheap street food snack or indulge in some fine dining. The Marvellous City has got you covered. For a healthy start sample exotic tropical fruits, fresh or blended into a ‘vitamina’ (smoothie).

Lima, Peru

Lima has carved out a spot as one of the gastronomy centres of Latin America. No small part down to 9 entries in the 50 Best Restaurants. It’s not all fine dining and innovative gastronomy. At its heart is the humble fare which helped inspire its more lavish counterparts. The food has influences coming from Asia, Europe and the Moors, and its ancient civilizations. Together a bounty of fine produce coming from the mountains, desert coast and rainforest. No wonder that it’s achieved global recognition today.

Buenos Aires, Argentina

Another culinary heavyweight, the capital of Argentina has got an impressive list of entries in the 50 Best. As you enjoy the food, you’ll taste its Italian roots – rich pasta dishes, breaded milanesa and long list of creamy cheeses. Yet the undisputed champion of Argentine cuisine is beef and they know how to cook it. Forget vegetables or dainty salads, slabs of the best beef on the continent char-grilled are the order of the day. Breakfasts are also a treat, with buttery pastries washed down with plenty of milky coffee.

São Paulo, Brazil

Sao Paulo is still crowned as Brazil’s top foodie hotspot. In part due to the successful restaurants like Alex Atala’s D.O.M. He uses Amazonian ingredients to produce new dishes. Italian immigrants also brought European techniques which rubbed off with today’s Brazilian cuisine. With the highest population of Japanese of any city outside Tokyo, good sushi is not hard to find.

Are you ready to explore Latin America’s culinary heavyweights? Want to head off with our guides to discover the best hidden street eats or let us book you an exclusive table in one of the capital’s top restaurants? Get in touch with one of our Latin America experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or email us here.

How to spend two days in El Calafate

Two days is never enough to truly discover a place, but sometimes that’s all you’ve got. Use this handy little guide to make the most of your time in El Calafate. This town that lies in the foothills of the Andes in SW Argentina. It is the gateway to wonderful scenery of the Patagonian icefield and the plains.

8 a.m.

Wake up to the sight of the snow-capped Andes out of hotel window. There are few views that measure up to the backdrop of mountain scenery. El Calafate is all about adventure, but you can’t start a strenuous day without a hearty breakfast. Head down to Pietro’s Café for a big plate of eggs or pancakes washed down with plenty of strong coffee.

9 a.m.

Today explore one of South America’s great natural wonders – Perito Moreno Glacier. After the winding mountain roads, you’ll reach the enormous icy behemoth. The glacier is best admired from the wooden boardwalks or take a boat across the lake. If you’re lucky, you could see a huge chunk of ice calve off and crash into the water below. For active adventurers, don crampons with a guide to walk over the glacier. Return to El Calafate in the late afternoon.

7 p.m.

Feeling famished? There’s few better places to hole up for an evening of good food with good company than La Lechuza. This cosy little place is famous for its barbecued meat and proper Italian baked pizzas. All accompanied with a glass of Argentine red or a cold cerveza. Be warned, the restaurant can get busy, but it’s worth the wait.

9 p.m.

Yeti ice bar

If the glacier hasn’t been chilly enough for you, swing by the Yeti Ice Bar, the only one of its kind in town. Here, you pay for the time you’re in the bar with unlimited drinks during your stay. A unique experience to complete the night, be sure to wear warm cloths.

8 a.m.

Order a spot of breakfast at the hotel. If you’re feeling lazy, you could even call room service. Then enjoy it on the balcony in full view of the surrounding mountain scenery.

9 a.m.

To complement yesterday’s adventure into the wilderness, drop into the natural history museum. This chronicles the history of Patagonia from the Ice Age onwards. You’ll find many of exhibits, photography, and artefacts to keep you busy most of the morning. Also, don’t miss The Glaciarium, you’ll leave with a deep understanding of this mountainous region.

12 p.m.

Take your rental car and head out to Estancia Cristina in Los Glaciares Park, where you can soak up the gaucho way of life. Watch sheep shearing, learn to herd cattle, or horse-ride through the grassy plains. Of course, you can gorge on asado barbecued meat. If time permits, be sure to take a visit to Los Perros Waterfall.

8 p.m.

End your 48 hours in El Calafate, with a mouth-watering dinner at La Tablita, a restaurant that’s been serving up Argentine classics for over 40 years. Start with a little cured meat, some cheeses and a lip-smacking empanada before digging into some of the tastiest and most tender lamb in Patagonia.

Sold on a visit to El Calafate? Call on of our Argentina travel experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or email us here to start planning your trip today.

10 off grid hotels in Latin America

Want to get away from the bustle of the city and truly understand a new culture or place? To do so, you’ll need to leave the distractions of home behind. Dump the laptop and mobile phone and immerse yourself. You likely return having had a more fulfilling trip. Here’s 10 hotels in Latin America where you can do that.

La Sofia, Argentina

It may only be a couple of hours from the metropolis of Buenos Aires, but it couldn’t be any different. Here, you’ll stay with a local family at a charming 6-bedroom estancia. Spend your days learning to horse ride with gauchos, play polo, sip Argentine wine and gorge on delicious home-cooked food. Relax in the Spanish colonial surroundings of the farm. It’s not hard to detach and get away from it all here.

Pook’s Hill, Belize

Nestled at the foothills of the Maya Mountains in Belize, Pook’s Hill is set in a gorgeous private reserve. It was once a sacred site to the ancient Maya people. Enjoy walking through the beautiful trails spotting wildlife. Relax at night in your simple thatched cabin made from locally sourced materials.

Palacio de Sal, Bolivia

A couple of nights at the remote Palacio de Sal will do wonders in helping you digital de-tox. While you won’t want to spend your whole holiday here it is ideal for a stop in this wilderness. Made entirely of salt and surrounded by the vast Uyuni salt flats, you won’t be able to pick up WiFi. Have fun playing a round of golf on the world’s only salt course.

Uxua Casa, Brazil

The idyllic fishing village of Trancoso is rarely visited by tourists. On cliff overlooking an endless beach. At its centre you’ll find ten beautifully restored 16th century fishermen’s homes. The rustic but chic individual cabins, created by designer Wilbert Das and local artists. They use reclaimed materials and traditional building methods. With a year-round tropical climate and the beach moments away, it’s an ideal place to get away from it all.

Eco Camp, Chile

If trekking is your thing, there are few places which match up to the Eco Camp located deep in the Patagonian wilderness. The remote hotel of individual domes resembling igloos. Don’t think for a minute they’re basic though. These comfortable glamping tents are anything but. During the day, you can head out to explore the awe-inspiring Torres del Paine National Park with the help of expert local guides.

Ecohabs, Colombia

For something a little more tropical, try the Ecohabs. These are a group of wooden cabins nestled on the side of a hill overlooking the azure Caribbean Sea. Tip-toe barefoot down to white sandy beaches nearby to spend your days reading books, working on your tan or cooling off in the sea. If you’re not a beach dweller, you can head off along the hiking trails in the Tayrona National Park to spot wildlife.

Lapa Rios Ecolodge, Costa Rica

If you want to get away from it all without leaving the comforts of home, try the Lapa Rios Ecolodge in Corcovado. The views from your room are astounding. The hotel sits atop a hill overlooking a pristine jungle reserve and the sea below. Drag yourself away from your private balcony, to spend days hiking along the trails, going dolphin spotting or swimming in the ocean.

Napo Wildlife Centre, Ecuador

When there’s no road to a hotel and the only way to reach it is by boat, you know that you’re truly getting away from it all. Deep in Ecuador’s Yasuni National Park, the Napo Wildlife Centre has a dozen comfortable cabins. During your stay, you’ll hike through the jungle to spot wildlife with naturalist guides. Climb tree towers, visit the local Anangu community and watch parrots at clay licks.

Chiminos Lodge Tikal, Guatemala

This tiny lodge is on an island in the Petexbatun Lagoon in Guatemala’s Peten jungle region. This is a real hide-away. With just 6 rustic bungalows, the accommodation never gets overcrowded. allowing you to appreciate the surrounding private forest and lake. Only monkeys and parrots to disturb you.

Manu Wildlife Centre, Peru

To reach the Manu Wildlife Centre, you take a 35-minute flight to Boca Manu and then a 90-minute journey by motorized canoe down the Madre de Dios River. The rustic lodge has 22 double bungalows crafted from bamboo and palm fronds harvested from the local area. At this lodge, you can hike out into the forests which has unparalleled wildlife watching.

Want to get away from it all on a Latin American adventure? Start planning your trip today by calling one of our travel experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or emailing us here.

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