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Category Archives: Uruguay

A guide to Uruguayan Food

The culinary delights of Uruguay have enjoyed a resurgence in recent years. Like Argentina, the Uruguayan diet is meat-heavy making it a little tricky for vegetarians, but a paradise for carnivores. Here’s our rundown of the best things to eat during your visit.

Asado

Let’s start with the most famous and most popular. The asado is essentially a barbecue, but unlike any you’ve known back at home. Huge cuts of beef, pork and lamb along with sausages and offal are slow cooked over huge charcoal parrillas. Best washed down with plenty of Uruguayan red. Visiting Uruguay without trying an asado is unthinkable.

Asado con cuero

Similar to a normal asado, the only variation being the whole animal, skin and all, is cooked over the flames. Typically, a cow or sheep, the body is spread eagle and then slow cooked for hours. The sheer space required to cook this means you’re more likely to find it in the countryside than the city.

Choripán

Choripán is a favourite of ours. This spicy chorizo sausage is cooked over charcoal and usually served in a bread with lashings of chimichurri sauce. Often one of the first things to come off an asado barbecue.

Empanada

There is nothing quite as iconic as the empanada. Almost every Latin American country has their own variety and Uruguay is no different. Typically filled with minced beef and cheese, these crispy baked pastry morsels are delicious. Just remember to order more than one! For something a little different, try the empanadas Gallegas, a fishy version packed with tuna and peppers.

Morcilla dulce

Black pudding, boiled pork blood sausage, tends to divide people. Some love the earthy flavour and texture, others can’t stand the stuff. In Uruguay, their morcilla comes with added raisins and nuts to give it a slightly sweeter taste than other versions.

Milanesa

A popular dish all over Latin America with roots firmly in Italy. Beef or chicken is flattened before being breaded and fried until golden brown. For something more luxurious, go for a milanesa rellena which includes melted cheese and ham.

Ñoquis

Flickr: Vince Alongi

Also known as gnocchi, this potato based pasta from Italy has long been eaten on the 29th of every month in Uruguay when the average worker gets paid. You can’t beat a bowl of homemade gnocchi which sometimes has a coin or note placed below it which is supposed to attract prosperity.

Pancho

Flickr: Rix Arg

Take a frankfurter and place between a bun called a pan de viena. Add plenty of condiments, and you’ve got the South American version of a hot dog. Great at the end of a heavy night to help soak up the booze.

Pizza por metro

Flickr: Simon Law

Literally meaning ‘pizza by the metre’, here it’s sold in rectangles not circles. Usually cooked in a big wood fired clay oven, you choose the ingredients you want it topped with.

Dulce de Leche

While not a dessert itself, it’s used in any manner of ways from spreading on toast to eating with your morning medialunas pastries. You won’t go far in Uruguay without seeing sweet, caramel-like dulce de leche.

Alfajores

Like Argentina, Uruguay have somewhat of an obsession with these short bread biscuits filled with sticky dulce de leche. We can see why. They are as delicious as they sound and best eaten with a strong black coffee.

Churros

These long star-shaped cylinders of fried dough covered in icing sugar have their origins in Spain, but they are just as popular in Uruguay. Look out for vendors setting up on street corners in the early evening and buy them as soon as they’ve come out the fryer.

Arroz con leche

Delicious, creamy rice pudding. What’s not to  like?.

Bizcochos

Usually served for breakfast, these little pastries of different sizes and shapes are eaten in the morning with strong black coffee. They can come as either sweet or savoury, both of which are delicious.

Grappamiel

The national drink of Uruguay, grappamiel is made from distilled spirit mixed with honey. It’s strong, so be careful when you’re drinking it.

Mate

Flickr: kweez mcG

Like the gauchos in Argentina, the yerba herbal drink of mate is consumed in the sort of quantities British drink tea. Many Uruguayan’s can be seen headed to work carrying a thermos flask of hot water and mate cups.

Want to try the food of Uruguay? Start planning your trip to the country today by calling one of our experts on +44 (0) 207 1478 or email us here.

UNUSUAL URUGUAY FOR CHRISTMAS?

Punta del Este

Even during summer, it is never too early to plan for the winter hols. With Christmas and New Year 6 months away, it is a good time to secure flights and hotels. Consider Uruguay. It´s about time this little gem nestled between Argentina and Brazil came into the spotlight. A small country but has around 660 km. coastline along the River Plate, the world´s biggest estuary. In the bustling capital Montevideo, enjoy strolling through the lovely old town and dining in fine restaurants. A few hours away, lies Uruguay´s oldest city, Colonia del Sacramento. Founded in 1680, it feels like stepping back in time. The city has a charming colonial ambiance, and old classic cars abound like in Havana. Jose Ignacio, a small coastal town, is an international jet-setter destination and Punta del Este is the must-see for beach lovers. Further north the coast becomes wilder and ideal for nature lovers.

The classy Hyatt hotel Carmelo Resort & Spa, on the banks of Rio de la Plata. It has holiday packages with activities: yoga lessons, Spa, bikes, tennis courts and daily activities at the kid´s club. The packages are subject to a minimum of 3 (Christmas) or 4 (New Year) consecutive nights. More information and rates on request. Contact us for travel ideas and itineraries.

CITY OF THE MONTH MONTEVIDEO: AN ANTIQUE SHOPPER’s DREAM

Browsing flea markets of Montevideo

Montevideo is a great city to wander. Much of the centre takes you back to a bygone era when people took the time to slow down. The neoclassical and Art Nouveau architecture recalls those times. The leafy plazas, and riverside walkways, invite you to ramble. The streets are dotted with cafes, bookstores, and a large collection of antique stores. Auction houses like Bavastro or Castells are packed with fine vintage treasures. Montevideo also features a popular flea market on Tristán Narvaja Street, where every Sunday morning visitors may find first-edition books, 1900s Leicas and other hidden gems. The markets are also great places to eat scrumptious grilled meats and other local delicacies. If you would like to discover Montevideo and its secrets, please contact us for Uruguay travel ideas.

The best street food you can get for under $5 in Latin America

Latin America isn’t short on street snacks. Like much of the world, some of the tastiest cuisine gets cooked on the fryers and planchas that line the streets on vendors’ carts. South America is not the cheapest continent, but plenty of cheap eats can be found if one knows what to look for.

Tacos – Mexico

Arguably the most iconic snack from Latin America. Though the recipe has been changed and adapted outside of Mexico, the true taco found on almost every street corner in Mexico is a small wheat tortilla topped with meat, fresh cheese, avocados, fish and/or salsa. Wrap them up yourself and get messy. Cost depends on filling and location, but typically they cost a dollar and most will need 2-3 as a meal.

Tamales – Ecuador

Flickr: verovera78

Flickr: verovera78

The Ecuadorian tamale is one of the tastiest street snacks. Wrapped inside a banana leaf, one finds a stable of cornmeal mixed with all manner of extras including vegetables, fried meats, spices, eggs and occasionally shrimp. It costs a couple of dollars, but one should be sufficient as a meal.

Carne y patata kebab – Peru

Flickr: Paul Lowry

Flickr: Paul Lowry

The cold nights in Peru’s high Andes means hearty fare is the order of the day. On most street corners, Andean women dressed in traditional garb patiently sear meat on a plancha. Look out for antichucho signs. $2 will get you enough mixed meats and fried potatoes to fill you up.

Empanadas – Argentina

empanadas-1117284_640

A stable street snack across South America. Like the UK’s Cornish pasty, the empanada is a baked (or fried) pastry filled with meat, cheese, vegetables or occasionally seafood. You’ll probably need two or three to fill up, but at around $1 each, it’s still going to be a cheap meal. Look out for special street carts selling empanadas or go into any bakery.

Tlayudas con carne – Mexico

While most visitors chow down on tacos (and why not, they are seriously good), those in the know also seek out tlayudas con carne. Crispy tortilla discs are topped with cheese, meats, avocado, salsa and a spicy dressing. They are a little more expensive then tacos, but larger and well worth the extra cost. Originating in Oaxaca, tlayudas con carne can now be found all over.

Buñuelos – Guatemala

Flickr: Matthew

Flickr: Matthew

Latin America’s love sweet food, especially the Guatemalans. Buñuelos are small fried doughnut-like balls covered in sugar and syrup. They are particularly popular around Christmas time and cost a dollar or two for a plate of several. They might not be enough to fill you up, but make for the perfect finish to your street food dinner.

Pastel – Brazil

Flickr: Wally Gobetz

Flickr: Wally Gobetz

Brazil tends to be more expensive than its neighbours, so finding those cheap eats is going to save you a heap of cash. Fortunatly, Brazilians have one of the world’s great street snacks – the pastel. A pocket of thin pastry is filled with all sorts of fillings, typically cheese, eggs, meat or seafood and fried to perfection. Yum. Each costs around a dollar, so they’re cheap enough to indulge on a few should you be hungry.

Carimañolas – Panama

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Flickr: luiseblanco

Carimañolas are seriously popular all over Panama. Yucca is boiled, mashed, shaped into oval balls and stuffed with meat and eggs before being fried until crisp. Their popularity mean these little fried balls are easy to find and cost under a dollar.

Arepas – Venezuela

corn-457153_640

Arepas are a national institution in Venezuela. Street carts are packed with hungry workers throughout the day. Flat baked rolls made from ground maize are cut in half and filled with grilled meats, chicken, avocados, cheese, fish or vegetables. Sometimes they are toasted or fried to add texture. At around $3 for an arepa, they are one of the more expensive street snacks in Latin America, but they are also more substantial.

Chorizo – Argentina

Argentina is not known for its vegetarianism. You’ll be hard pushed to find vegetables or salad in such a meat-loving country. Perhaps the best-known street snack in Argentina is chorizo, a slightly spicy sausage, grilled over a parilla barbeque and often served in a bun along with chimichurri sauce. For under $3, they won’t break the budget either.

Chicharrón – Colombia

Though it may not sound that good, and it’s certainly not very good for your health, chicharróns are delicious. Much like pork scratchings in the UK, chicharróns are fried pork rinds. Salty, greasy and tasty, these scrumptious morsels cost just a dollar or two and make for a quick snack on the run.

To start planning your tour of Latin America, get in touch with one of our specialists on +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or send us an email here.

25 random but interesting facts about Latin America you probably didn’t know

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  1. Angel Falls in Venezuela is one of the largest waterfalls in the world with a height of almost 1 kilometre.
  2. Colombia produces more than 90% of the world’s emeralds.
  3. Mexico is sinking by around 10 inches every year.
  4. Bolivia was the first country to get rid of McDonalds.
  5. Latin America is the most urbanized continent in the world with almost 80% of its citizens living in cities.
  6. Mambo, salsa, cha-cha-cha, rumba and tango dances all come from Latin America.
  7. It has the shortest coastline, compared to its size, of any continent.
  8. The official name of for Mexico is the United Mexican States.
  9. The oldest university in North America is the National University of Mexico.
  10. Costa Rica translated to ‘rich coast’.
  11. The Amazon spans eight countries – Ecuador, Peru, Colombia, Peru, Bolivia, Brazil, Venezuela and Guyana.
  12. Rio de Janeiro carnival is the world’s largest street festival.
  13. 20% of the world’s oxygen is created from the Amazon jungle.
  14. There are 77 uncontacted tribes living in the Amazon Jungle.
  15. There are over 20 million inhabitants in Sao Paulo making it one of the world’s largest cities.
  16. The highest mountain in South America is Argentina’s Aconcagua and stands at over 6,961metres high.
  17. The world’s most southerly city is located at the tip of Argentina and is called Ushuaia. It has around 55,000 inhabitants.
  18. Lake Titicaca is the largest lake in South America and straddles both Peru and Bolivia.
  19. Costa Rica has been ranked as the happiest country in the world.
  20. Asia is Latin America’s second largest trading partner after the United States.
  21. Ecuador was the first country in the world to give nature constitutional rights and can be defended in court.
  22. After the Antarctic, the Atacama Desert in the north of Chile is considered the world’s driest.
  23. Bolivia was the first country to have a ski resort with a rope tow.
  24. Darwin came up with his theory of evolution while visiting the Galapagos Islands.
  25. The Uyuni in Bolivia is the world’s largest salt flats.

To start exploring Latin America yourself, give one of our specialists a call on +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or send us a message here.

The best markets in South America

Otavalo Market, Otavalo

Located in the northern Ecuadorian town of the same name, Otavalo is perhaps one of the most famous markets in South America. Although the market operates every day, the largest is on Saturdays when thousands of indigenous locals descend upon the town to sell their colourful wares. Poncho clad locals barter over panama hats, the backdrop of snow-clad mountains in the background.

Witches’ Market, La Paz

Flickr: Yan Boechat

Flickr: Yan Boechat

Don’t miss the Witches’ Market in La Paz, a strange place for amulets, potions and herbs. Indigenous Aymara women in traditional bowler hats and colourful skirts barter and sell their wares, the summit of Huayna looming in the background. Dried llama fetuses are one of the most unusual products sold and found on every stall. Traditional they are buried under new houses to help bring wealth and luck.

Mercado del Puerto, Montevideo

Flickr: Jorge Gobbi

Flickr: Jorge Gobbi

A visit to Montevideo, the capital of Uruguay, wouldn’t be complete without a visit to Mercado del Puerto. Filled with restaurants and shops, this is an excellent place for people watching and trying the huge portions of asados (barbeques). Street performers and musicians set the mood as you tuck into delicious Uruguayan meats and seafood.

San Telmo Market, Buenos Aires

One of the best bric-a-brac and antique markets in the continent and one that offers a glimpse of old Argentina. Best visited on Sunday when market stalls line the Calle Defensa with piles of vintage cameras and old paintings. As you wander slowly along the street, stop to watch the tango dancers perform.

Mercado Central, Santiago

One of the best fish markets in the country. Not only is it a great place to discover Chile’s abundant fish produce, but also a great place to sample some in the one of the many restaurants and cafes. Try one of the local cafes that surround the market, instead of the touristy central restaurants. Even if you don’t plan to eat, it worth visiting for the architecture alone. The market building was constructed in the late 19th century, primarily from cast-iron produced in Glasgow.

Tarabuco Market, Nr. Sucre

This indigenous Sunday market located an hour or so from Sucre is an excellent place to pick up textiles, colourful bags, sweaters and hats. Take the early morning bus from Sucre and discover the unique indigenous Yampara culture, delicious cuisine, and pick up some souvenirs to take home.

Mercado Adolpho Lisboa, Manaus

Located in the steamy port city of Manaus in the middle of the Amazon, the Mercado Adolpho Lisboa (or Mercado Municipal). The large open market sells everything from fresh produce, spices and indigenous medicines and was constructed in the late 19th century modelled on Les Halles in Paris, France. Most of the buildings structure was even built in Paris and transported to Manaus by ship.

Pisac Market, Pisac

Pisac is another of South America’s most famous markets. The Sunday market is visited by thousands of tourists who come to barter for colourful handcrafts and textiles. Like Otavalo, many come vendors come from far and wide to see their products. The market is an excellent place to try classic Peruvian dishes and is best combined with a visit to Ollantaytambo, the last remaining town inhabited by Incas.

To start planning your tour of Latin America, get in touch.

The Fray Bentos factory in Uruguay gets UNESCO status

Remember Fray Bentos? The food manufacturer whose signature product is pie-in-a-can? If you don’t we hope this doesn’t jog any unfortunate memories of corned beef fritters at school.

The name Fray Bentos comes from the name of the town in which the meat supplied for its pies was sourced, processed and packed in Uruguay. This ruin of a factory has now been given World Heritage status by UNESCO.

The empty meatpacking factory on the banks of the River Uruguay certainly looks impressive, and to some I’m sure it’s history is fascinating, however it’s debatable whether it is worthy of such an accolade. It will certainly bring in a welcome increase in tourism to the region.

Our Top 25 Most Unique Hotels In Latin America

From floating hotels on a Uruguayan lake to an aircraft nestled amongst trees in Costa Rica’s rainforest, we’ve searched high and low for Latin America’s most unusual and unique places to stay. Surprisingly Chile comes out on top with an impressive total of eleven.

Laguna Garzón Lodge – José Ignacio, Uruguay

Laguna Garzon

Explora Patagonia – Torres del Paine, Chile

Explora Patagonia

Ecohabs – Tayrona National Park, Colombia

Ecohabs

Montaña Magica – Huilo Huilo, Chile

Magic Mountain

Eco Camp – Torres del Paine, Chile

Ecocamp

Cristal Samaña – Uyuni Salt Flats, Bolivia

Cristal Samana

Home Hotel – Buenos Aires, Argentina

Home Hotel

Arrebol Patagonia – Puerto Varas, Chile

Arrebol

Inkaterra Canopy Treehouse – Amazon, Peru

Canopy Treehouse

Morerava Cottages – Easter Island, Chile

Morerava Cottages

Quinta Real Zacatecas – Zacatecas, Mexico

Quinta Real Zacatacas

Hotel Unique – São Paulo, Brazil

hotel_unique (5)

Awasi Patagonia – Torres del Paine, Chile

awasi_patagonia

Espejo de Luna – Chiloé, Chile

Espejo de Luna

Canopy Tower – Soberanía National Park, Panama

Canopy Tower

Pueblo Barrancas Ecolodge – Pedrera, Uruguay

Pueblo Barrancas

Hotel Costa Verde 727 Fuselage – Manuel Antonio, Costa Rica

727 Fuselage

Canopy Village – Huilo Huilo, Chile

Canopy Village

Cristalino Jungle Lodge – Alta Floresta, Brazil

Cristalino Jungle Lodge

Nothofagus Hotel & Spa – Huilo Huilo, Chile

Nothofungus

Aqua Amazon – Amazon, Peru

Aqua Amazon

Entre Cielos – Mendoza, Argentina

Entre Cielos

Reino Fungi Lodge – Huilo Huilo, Chile

Reina Fungi

Hotel Endemico – Valle de Guadalupe, Mexico

Hotel Endemico

Nidos de Pucón Tree Lodge – Pucón, Chile

Nidos de Pucon Tree Lodge

To start booking your unique stay in Latin America contact the experts.

A Guide To The National Drinks Of Latin America

National drinks throughout Latin America vary immensely. Some opt for teas, others beer or liquor. Of course, there is also the age old debate on the origins of the Pisco Sour – the Peruvians or the Chileans. Whichever country you’re visiting, we highly recommend trying the national beverage. Most are delicious (although be careful with that Colombia fire water) and it’s a great way to immerse yourself in the local culture.

Argentina & Uruguay – Mate

Mate - ArgentinaFlickr/Marcos Cousseau

Most would imagine that the Argentinians and Uruguayans would choose alcoholic beverages as their national drinks. However, they have opted for the mate tea, particularly popular in rural areas (gauchos consume considerable amounts each day). This bitter tea made from the yerba plant is more than just a drink, it’s a daily ritual shared amongst friends and family. Find out how to prepare mate in the traditional way.

Brazil – Caipirinha

caipirinha - brazilFlickr/CristinaPessini

Although this zingy cocktail of cachaçu (a type of Brazilian sugar cane rum), sugar and lime juice served over plenty of ice is a delight wherever you are, it particularly good in its home country. Better still, grab one at the beach bars in Rio de Janeiro as you watch the sunset over the bay.

Bolivia – Singani

Singani_samples
Wikipedia/DGFritz

The Singani is a distilled liquor made from white Muscadet grapes and although it’s not brandy, most exports are marketed as brandy. Production of Singani is limited only to the Bolivian Andes and began way back in the 16th century.

Chile & Peru – Pisco Sour

Pisco sour - PeruFlickr/ Cathrine Lindblom Gunasekara

The age old debate on the origins of the pisco sour continues to this day. Both make claims to the invention of this tasty beverage and both consider it their national drink. However, there are subtle differences between the two. Both use pisco liquor as the base ingredient, as well as lime, sugar and ice, but the Peruvians add egg white and Angostura bitter to the mix. Both are excellent and slip down all too well.

Colombia – Aguardiente

Aguardiente - ColombiaFlickr/matias Jaramillo

Aguardiente or fire water, a type of sugarcane liquor, can be found in many countries across Latin America, although it is perhaps most popular in Colombia who have declared it their national drink. This clear anise-flavoured liquor is usually drunk neat or with a dash of water.

Costa Rica – Guaro

Guaro Sour - Costa RicaFlickr/David Berkowitz

This clear liquor made from sugarcane is similar to Colombia’s fire water and is found in many countries across Central and South America. It is sometimes referred to as ‘soft vodka’ and is typically served in a refreshing Guaro Sour.

Ecuador – Canelazo

Baños, Ecuador
Flickr/FabulousFabs

This warming tea of cinnamon sticks, whole cloves, sugar, orange zest and a dash of Ecuadorian fire water is typical of the Andean region. Perfect for a cold night in the mountains.

Guatemala – Gallo Beer

Gallo Beer - GuatemalaFlickr/David Dennis

Guatemalans are proud of their Gallo (rooster) beer, their national drink. This excellent, refreshing lager is hugely popular throughout the country.

Mexico – Tequila

Tequila - Mexico
Flickr/Douglas Muth

Perhaps the most iconic of national drinks in the world. Who would imagine that liquor made from the nectar of the humble blue agave plant could be so popular around the world. Mexican laws when it comes to Tequila are tight and it can only be made in the state of Jalisco (and limited regions of a number of others). The best way to drink tequila is neat, although margaritas are also pretty good.

Panama – Seco Herrerano

Seco Herrerano - Panama
Flickr/Anamaris Cousins Price

Another excellent sugarcane liquor. Seco Herrerano differs due to its longer process of distillation. It is traditionally drunk neat, although it can also be used as a replacement for vodka or rum in cocktails.

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