(0)20 7407 1478

855 625 2753 US

New tour visit the Carnival and Amazon

It might only seem like the last Carnival was just yesterday, but we’re quickly racing towards 2018. If you want to visit the famous Carnival, now’s the time book, as hotels and flights only get more expensive.

If you’re going to take part in the Carnival, why not combine it with some of Brazil’s other highlights? We’ve created a new tour which takes visitors to the Carnival, the might Iguaçu Falls and takes a comfortable, but adventurous cruise down the Amazon in search of some amazing wildlife – Carnival & Cruise.

After arriving in Rio de Janeiro, you’ll be picked up and taken to your hotel. We suggest you stay at the Arena Leme Hotel, though if you book early there are plenty of options to chose from. Head down to the beach, grab a icy cold caipirinha, dig you toes into the sand and soak up the atmosphere – the perfect introduction to Brazil.

The next fours days, you’re going to quickly pick up how to party like a carioca at the world’s largest street party. Get a seat at the Sambadrome and watch the colourful parade of dancers and performers. The parade has been a tradition for almost 90 years and there are over 70 samba schools that take party. 90,000 spectators pile into the 2,300 foot long stadium to watch the extraordinary dancing and floats.

The parade might be fun, but there are other things to do in Rio de Janeiro during Carnival. Blocos are 24-hour street parties that pop up throughout the city. People con costumes and here is plenty of beer and Brazilian rum. Numbers can quickly reach the thousands when live music arrives. For something a little more exclusive, there are several balls going on throughout the event. The Copacabana Palace Hotel on Rio’s seafront, hosts an annual ball where guests dress up in evening gowns and tuxedos.

If this is your first time in Brazil, don’t worry. You won’t miss out on the bucket list activities during your stay. During the tour, we’ll arrange for you in visit the Christ Redeemer, Tijuca National Park, Corcovado and Sugarloaf Mountain. After five days, you’ll almost be able to call yourself a carioca!

After the festivities are over, we’ll whisk you away to see Iguaçu Falls where you will stay at the Falls Iguazu Hotel on the Argentine side.The Indians believed that the falls were the mouth of the gods, and when you see them, you’ll release why. The falls were made famous in Robert De Niro’s film, The Mission, in which you see him teeter over the edge strapped to a crucifix.

For the next two days, you’ll explore every side of this huge natural wonder. Cross over to the Argentine side to see the falls from the wooden walkways. One of the biggest thrills is walking over the suspended platform that traverses The Devil’s Throat, a gurgling, spitting, rampaging flurry of water. We can even arrange for you to stay a boat trip into the heart of the falls, where you get so close you can feel the spray on your face.

Lastly, you’ll fly north to Manaus, a city in the centre of the Amazon. The city boomed in the late 19th century when it was used as a base for rubber tapping. We’ll take you to see the huge 18th century Amazonas Theatre, an impressive piece of architecture. Afterwards you will board the comfortable Amazon Odyssey expedition cruise boat, your home for the next four nights. Venture into the Rio Negro and along the Amazon River. Hike through the forest in search of exotic bird life and mammals including many species of monkey. You’ll be accompanied by expert guides which ensure you make the most of your time here.

To book Carnival & Cruise, call us today or +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or email us here. You can find out more about the tour here.

TROPICANA BIRD PARK IGUAÇU

Toucan in the Bird Park

Brazil’s Iguaçu Falls National Park is full of exotic wildlife. Exploring the tropical waterfalls is a real ‘bucket-list’ experience, but there’s much more to discover. Often overlooked, is the Parque das Aves or ‘Bird Park’, an ornithological sanctuary. Here rescued birds are find a home. This attraction is a bonus for any wildlife enthusiast. Our private excursion will take a behind the scenes look at the park. You will spend time in the company of chattering songbirds, start at either 7.30am, 10.30am or 2pm. Though we recommend the early morning slot for keen twitchers.

You will have the chance to see staff at work, watch feeding and see rare species up close. Learn how passionate park rangers care for these beautiful, vulnerable creatures. Parque das Aves is also home to a blissful butterfly garden, and a resident boa constrictor. Round the visit off by enjoying some light refreshments and fresh fruit from the region. A delicious, sweet end to this insightful birding experience. This can be booked as part of any tour of the region.

5 cable cars to take in South America

Cable cars are, in our opinion, one of the best modes of transport. Quick, no traffic and it’s possible to take in the landscape or city from above. Many of the cities located along the Andes are, unsurprisingly, hilly, making transport difficult. Though some cable cars are being used for tourism, others are transforming parts of Latin American cities by making the areas more accessible.

Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

South America’s most well-known and oldest is Rio de Janeiro’s Sugarloaf Mountain cable car. Built in the early 20th century, it was designed for tourists to take in the city views from the mountain’s summit. The journey takes just a few minutes to reach the top.

La Paz, Bolivia

Flickr: Inhabitat

Flickr: Inhabitat

The highly successful state-run cable car that connects La Paz with El Alto is the highest in the world. Since its inauguration in 2014, millions of tourists and locals have used the cable car which costs just £0.25. The line can reportedly carry a staggering 18,000 people per hour. During the World Cup, some of the cars were painted to look like footballs.

Santiago, Chile

Flickr: Robert Cutts

Flickr: Robert Cutts

The Teleférico Metropolitano was built in 1980, but has since been refurbished and reopened late last year. It takes tourists and locals up to the huge Metropolitan Park, one of the largest in Chile. Some of the cabins have been adapted to fit bikes, a popular sport in the park.

Medellín, Colombia

Another highly successful transport system, the Medellín Metrocable opened almost fifteen years ago, and has helped to connect the cities hilly districts. More lines have since been added, the latest being in 2016.  The city one an award for innovation in 2012.

Quito, Ecuador

Flickr: Stuart King

Flickr: Stuart King

The Quito Teleférico hasn’t been created as a mode of transport to get around the city. The cable car starts are 2,950 metres above sea level and arrives in the heady heights of Cruz Loma at 4,050 metres. Fantastic views over the city and the adjacent Pichincha Volcano can be seen from the top. It’s also possible to spot Antisana, Cotopaxi and Rumiñahui on clear days.

If you’d like to take any of the cable cars in South America, or visit anywhere else on the continent, speak to one of our travel experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478.

French artist projects faces of Amazon tribe onto rainforest canopy

Deforestation continues to sweep through the Amazon rainforest. A 2016 project by French street artist Philippe Echaroux aimed to draw attention to the issue through art. While staying with the indigenous Suruí tribe in Brazil, Echaroux photographed the local people and projected their images up onto the rainforest canopy at night creating staggeringly beautiful images in the trees.

The idea behind the project was highlighting the deep connection between the rainforest and the people that live there. Their existence relies on the forest, so it stresses the importance of preserving the region. The work was creating in collaboration with the tribe’s chief Almir Suri Narayamoga who is also working with the Brazilian government to replant this area of the Amazon.

Late last year, Echaroux displayed his photography at the Taglialatella Gallery in Paris. Unfortunately, the exhibition is now over, but the work can still be seen on his website or Facebook page.

4caee7b4e9597cdab8a7faf8c1f59c63 Philippe-Echaroux-Amazon-Photography-2 (1) Philippe-Echaroux-Amazon-Photography-3 Philippe-Echaroux-Amazon-Photography-4 Philippe-Echaroux-Amazon-Photography-5 Philippe-Echaroux-Amazon-Photography-6 (1) Philippe-Echaroux-Amazon-Photography-6 Philippe-Echaroux-Amazon-Photography-7 Philippe-Echaroux-Amazon-Photography-8 work

Première Mondiale: du Street Art au coeur de la Forêt Amazonienne – World First Street Art in the Rainforest. from pays-imaginaire.fr on Vimeo.

Photos by Philippe Echaroux

Want to visit the Amazon rainforest? Get in touch with our travel experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478 to discuss your travel plans.

2017 Latin America travel bucket list

Thinking of travelling to Latin America in 2017? With such a huge area spanning two continents, we thought we’d put together a handy list of the most bucket list worthy things to do in Latin America. From hiking through the Andes to watching turtles on the beaches of Costa Rica, the area really does have something for everyone.

Wander through Tikal, Guatemala

tikal-889761_960_720

The ancient ruins of Tikal were built and occupied by the Maya civilization for over a thousand years and is one of the most impressive ruins in all of Latin America. The sprawling complex has over 3,000 structures, some of which are in remarkable good condition. You’ll feel like Indiana Jones as you wander through the ancient site surrounded by thick jungle and the sounds of howling monkeys and birds.

See penguins in the Antarctic

emperor-penguins-429127_960_720

One of the most bucket list worthy travel adventures on the planet. Take to one of the limited expedition vessels and head out to explore the white continent. There are plenty of penguin species to see including the cheeky chinstraps and gentoos, and the more impressive kings and emperors, the latter usually requires an adventurous helicopter flight to reach them. There is no where on earth as pristine as the Antarctic. While breathtaking is an overused word, there really is no other way to describe the landscapes of towering icebergs, glistening glaciers and majestic fjords.

Hang glide over Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

flight-652265_960_720

Most visit sun kissed Rio de Janeiro for the relaxed pace where the caipirinhas flow and the beach is always appealing. Inject a little adventure and see the city from a new perspective by taking a hang glide. Don’t worry, you won’t be doing it alone. Your guide will fly while you can take the time to take in the surroundings. Take off from the top of Tijuca National Park forest and glide around getting excellent views of the city, beaches and Christ the Redeemer before effortlessly landing on the beach below.

Hike the Salkantay, Peru

Flickr: vil.sandi

Flickr: vil.sandi

While the Inca Trail has become the most popular hiking route to reach Machu Picchu, visitors often forget that there are many other trails. The Salkantay Trek is much less hiked and arguably more scenic (it’s been voted one of the 25 best hikes in the world). It’s also challenging. Those who take on the trek will have to reach some of the highest parts of the Humantay Mountain crossing passes higher than 6,000 metres. But those who do are rewarded with some extraordinary views of snow-capped peaks.

See the wildlife in the Pantanal, Brazil

crocodile-1721922_960_720

The wildlife in the Pantanal rivals that of the Amazon. The difference is the wildlife in these vast wetlands are much easier to spot than the thick jungle. Visitors first drive down the famous Transpantaneira Road stopping to watch crossing caiman and nearby bird life. Once in the wetlands, visitors can stay at any one of the comfortable lodges and take daily excursions by foot, horseback, boat or 4×4 to see wildlife including giant otters, anacondas, caimans, monkeys, marsh deer, tapirs and many species of bird, herons and egrets to hawks and macaws. It’s even possible to see a jaguar from some of the deeper Pantanal lodges.

Scuba dive off Fernando do Noronha, Brazil

holiday_brazil_scuba_diving_rays

While South American isn’t known for its marine life as say Asia or Australasia, there are still some excellent spots. Fernando do Noronha Islands lies off the coast of northern Brazil. Here the marine life is abundant and its possible to scuba dive or snorkel with colourful schools of fish, lobsters, manta rays, baby sharks and octopus.

Swim with whale sharks off Holbox Island, Mexico

rock-sail-1313999_960_720

Our top pick for things to do in Latin America. Whale sharks visit the Holbox Island off Mexico for just a couple of months each year. These huge behemoths are the largest fish in the world and while it may seem scary to snorkel with huge sharks, they are harmless to humans. These gentle giants open their large mouths to filter krill and plankton from the oceans.

Watch hatching baby turtles in Tortuguero, Costa Rica

turtle-701663_960_720

Tortuguero National Park on Costa Rica’s northern Caribbean coast are a nature-lovers’ paradise. Cut off from the rest of the country, a plane or boat is the only way to access the region. It’s one of the world’s best places to see green turtles as they come ashore at night to lay their eggs in the sand. Later in the year those young break out of their shells and make the brave journey along the beach to the sea.

Hike to the Lost City, Colombia

Flickr: Andrew Hyde

Flickr: Andrew Hyde

Machu Picchu is undoubtable the most recognizable of ruins in Latin America, but Colombia’s Lost City is just as impressive and with far fewer tourists. To reach the uncrowded ruins, one must take a 4 day hike through thick forest and climb 1,200 steps. Along the way sleep in hammocks in local villages. It’s not unusual to arrive at the Lost City and be the only ones there. Go before this Lost City doesn’t feel quite as lost.

Horse ride with Gauchos in Las Pampas, Argentina

horses-52701_960_720

Whether you are a beginner or advanced rider, all are welcome to visit the Argentine grasslands of Las Pampas. Spend your days with the cowboys of South America, riding through the steppe, rounding cattle, listening to their folklore stories around campfires and sampling some hearty Argentine barbeques. There are plenty of luxurious homestays for those who want a little more comfort on their stay.

To start planning your ultimate bucket list tour of Latin America, speak to one of our travel experts on +(0) 207 407 1478 or email us here.

The difference between Paraty and Búzios

colonial-108009_960_720

If you’re looking for a day-trip or weekend getaway from Rio de Janeiro, there are several excellent options right on the city’s doorstep. Either side of the bustling hive of activity that is Rio are two very popular tourist destinations, almost equidistant from the city. To the east is Armação dos Búzios – shortened to Búzios for simplicity’s sake – a vibrant beachside town packed with nightlife and activity. To the west, an hour further from Rio than Búzios, is Paraty, an old colonial port town brimming with history and natural attractions. In terms of price, the two are fairly comparable (both at the upper end of the scale), so when making a choice about which is right for you, you will need to consider what it is you want from your visit.

Búzios

beach-667978_960_720

This resort was popularised by Brigitte Bardot in the 1960s, and today a statue of the actress can be found in the town. Bardot is also credited with making famous the bikini – and you can expect to see plenty of these on show in town as well. With around twenty beaches scattered along the popular peninsula, lazing in the sun and partaking in the occasional dip in the sea (as well as scuba diving and surfing for the more active traveller) are the order of the day.

When the sun goes down, the town really comes to life. Famed for its raucous nightlife, there are a multitude of bars and clubs, generally open from around 10pm until the early hours. In high season (November – March and June – July) the town is packed to the rafters, especially during the peak month of December. Come prepared to party!

Paraty

paraty-856183_960_720

A little under 250km in the opposite direction from Rio, Paraty is a seaside port town first colonised by the Portuguese in the mid-17th century. Used as the principle harbour for exporting gold from Brazil, the town is crammed with quaint cobbled streets, picturesque churches and heritage etched into the very stones of its historic centre.

In the surrounding area you will also find many gorgeous beaches, lush waterfalls, dense rainforests and over 300 islands. The latter can be visited by boat on one of the many trips offered at the seafront; the clarity of the water also makes it a popular spot for snorkelling and diving. Though there are a number of bars in Paraty, the nightlife is considerably lower-key than in Búzios and there aren’t really any out-and-out nightclubs to speak of. Rather it is a beautiful spot to enjoy a cocktail or three while gazing out over the sparkling crystalline waters of the bay.

Less than 100km from Paraty is the gateway to one of Brazil’s truly beautiful hidden gems, Ilha Grande. Just an hour and a half drive to Angra dos Reis and a short ferry ride will take you to the big island; if you have enough time in your itinerary, I definitely recommend squeezing it in.

Which should you choose?

Whether you pick Búzios or Paraty will depend entirely on your personal circumstances and expectations from the visit. Do you want to party the night away and spend the following day recovering on the beach? Búzios is your place. Or would you rather soak up a little Brazilian culture, visit antiquated landmarks and relax instead of romp? If so, Paraty should be preferred. Whichever you choose, you’re guaranteed to pass some of the most unforgettable days of your life on Brazil’s southern coast.

To start planning your trip to Búzios or Paraty (or both!) contact one of our travel experts on +(0) 207 407 1478 or email us here.

Brazilian condensed milk cake (bolo de leite condensado) recipe

Cake is big in Brazil. It’s can be eaten throughout the day, even at breakfast. This Brazilian condensed milk cake is light, moist, fluffy and the perfect accompaniment to a coffee. With few ingredients, it’s simple to make and can easily be adapted with nuts, lemon, chocolate, coconut and fruit to make a more complex cake. Typically, the cake is baked in a circular or ringed baking tray, but if you don’t have one, any loaf tin will do.

Ingredients:

1 can of sweetened condensed milk
2 eggs
400ml full fat milk
50ml butter
250g plain flour
125g white sugar
1tbs baking powder
Icing sugar for dusting
Lemon zest
Salt

Method:

Preheat the oven to 180°C. Beat the eggs and sugar until they form a paste. Melt the butter for a few seconds in the microwave until soft. Beat the butter into the eggs and sugar. Add the condensed milk and full fat milk and beat. Sift the flour, baking powder and salt into the bowl and then mix into a smooth batter. Zest a whole lemon and add to the mixture.

Take a round cake tin and rub all over with butter. Pour the batter into the tin and place into the oven for around 45 minutes. To ensure the cake is cooked, put a small knife or skewer into the cake which should come out clean. The top should golden brown and to have risen. Leave the cake to cool in the tin and then remove and leave on a metal rack. Once cooled, dust with icing sugar all over. The cake should keep for 5 days in a sealed tin.

To eat the cake in Brazil, contact one of our travel experts on +(0) 207 407 1478 or email us here.

Latin America’s most colourful festivals

brazil-1708773_960_720

The world is full of colourful festivals and none come as colourful as those in Latin America. While Carnival in Rio de Janeiro, the world’s largest street party, is perhaps the best known (and for good reason), there are plenty of festivals throughout the continent and throughout the year. Here are 11 of our favourite festivals to look out for.

Carnival

carnival

Carnival is celebrated throughout the towns and villages of Brazil and the rest of Latin America, but the largest and best known is the celebrations in Rio de Janeiro. With millions of people hitting the streets in February, it’s the largest street party in the world. The city hosts over 500,000 foreign tourists who come to enjoy famed parade of colourful dancers and musicians in the sambodrome.

Tango championship

dance-238263_960_720

Buenos Aires plays host to the annual World Tango Championship. This famous dance originated in the 19th century in the nightclubs around the district of River Plate. It’s quickly becoming one of Argentina’s most valued culture exports with more enthusiasm into the tango around the world than ever before. During the festival, every bar, ballroom and milonga throughout the city comes alive with dancers and the sound of tango music. Held in August, it’s one of the best times to visit the city.

Day of the Dead

day-of-the-dead-568012_960_720

Dia de los Muertos (Day of the Dead) is often confused with Halloween as the dates are very close. However, the event which is celebrated throughout Mexico stems from an Aztec festival that honours the goddess Michacacihuatl. Mexicans believe that the souls of lost loved ones return to earth on the 2nd November to be with their family once more. Families visit the graves of lost ones to pay their respects and leave food and drink.

Inti Raymi

Another famous festival in Peru which sees thousands of people descend upon Cuzco to take the pilgrimage to the ruins of Sacsayhuaman. The festival lasts for nine days between the winter solstice and the Inca New Year. Inti Raymi means ‘Sun Festival’ in Quechuan, and that is exactly what this festival is about. Honouring the sun god and hoping for the quick return in the darker days as well as a good crop and harvest in the coming months. It’s now the second largest festival in Latin America with well over 200,000 visitors last year.

Qoyllur Rit’i

Q’oyllur Riti is one of the least know and intriguing festivals in the Andes. A combination of Pre-Columbian fertility ceremonies and Catholic processions with colorful dancers and Andean panpipe music make this festival special. The main ceremony is held at the foot of Mount Ausangate. At almost 5,000 metres above sea level, the temperatures plunge to below freezing at night. That doesn’t stop worshippers from turning up to gather at the shrine which is said to be where the infant Christ appeared to a young Indian boy.

Flower festival

August sees the annual flower festival called La Feria de los Flores in Medellin. The colourful fair is attended by visitors from all over the world who eagerly descend upon the ‘City of Eternal Spring’ to see the huge flower festivals, parades, dance performances and theatre. Each year the displays and events get larger and more impressive. The event was original planned for one year in 1957, but was such a success it’s now an annual fixture.

Tapati Rapa Nui festival

Easter Island has few cultural connections with Chile and more with the Polynesian islands that surround it. During Tapati Rapa Nui festival, the ancient ancestral traditions are recreated. These include Takona (body painting), singing competitions, Haka Pei (where people slide down the cliff on a banana tree) and Tau’a Rapa Nui (sports on Rano Raraku volcano). It’s one of the most interesting festivals anywhere in the world as well as being one of the most remote.

Santa Semana

Like Carnival, Santa Semana (Holy Week) has celebrations throughout Latin America (as well as many other parts of the world). One of the most colourful is Antigua in Gautemala. This pretty colonial town comes alive with colour. Intricate designs using petals and coloured sawdust carpet the cobbled streets. These are destroyed by bare-footed, purple-robed men carrying statues of Jesus and the Virgin Mary. Other excellent places to celebrate Santa Semana include Quito in Ecuador and Copacabana in Bolivia.

To visit any of the above festivals or any place in Latin America contact one of our travel experts on +(0) 207 407 1478 or email us here. Alternatively, can view some example tours here.

Brazilian acarajé recipe

2126528529_d02cf9cf3f_b

Flickr: ManoelNetto

These fried pea balls are commonly found on the streets of Brazil’s northern Bahia state. They are also used in religious offerings to the gods in the Candomblé religion. Though these are now thought of as typically Brazilian, they dish was brought by the slaves of West Africa. Still to these day, similar snacks are found in Nigeria, Ghana, Mali, Gambia, Togo and Sierra Leone.

Serves: 20 acarajé
Time: 1 hour
Ingredients

Acarajé balls

½ kg onions
½ kg black eyed peas, drained from can
Vegetable oil for frying
Seasoning

Filling

100g cashews
100g peanuts
1 large onion, finely chopped
250g dried prawns
½ kg bread, day old stale bread works best
3 garlic cloves, finely chopped
1 thumb of ginger, finely chopped
1 ltr coconut milk
1 tomato, chopped
1 handful of coriander, finely chopped
Vegetable oil
Seasoning

Method

Take the dried shrimps and soak them in water.

Add the peas, onions and seasoning and blend into a rough paste. Remove and set aside.

Add the shrimps to the blender along with the nuts and bread and wizz for a minute or so.

Heat a little oil in a saucepan and cook off the ginger, garlic, onions until soft, usually around five minutes or so. Add the rest of the ingredient except the coriander and cook for about half an hour, seasoning to taste. At the end, mix in the chopped coriander.

Take a very large saucepan (or turn on a fryer if you have one) and heat oil. Take the pea and onion mix and form into balls. Drop these into the hot oil in batches, cooking for about 5 minutes. Once they are golden brown, remove from the oil and lay on kitchen towel to soak up excess grease and cool a little.

Cut across the centre of each cooked ball and fill with the vatapá mix, some extra chopped tomatoes, some spicy sauce if you have it and coriander. Serve immediately.

Discovering the treasures of Brazil’s ‘Plateau of Diamonds’

Discovering a potentially priceless gem only makes visiting the beautiful Chapada Diamantina (‘plateau of diamonds’) even more compelling.

In the mid-nineteenth century this mineral rich and landlocked region of Brazil was prized for the elusive diamonds that could be found within the limestone cliffs, mountains and cave systems that define the landscape.

Today, a popular starting point for adventures in the national park is the pretty and beautifully-preserved nineteenth-century town of Lençóis. The diamond miners may be long gone but Lençóis retains a wonderfully colonial ambience, and among its cobbled streets visitors will find plentiful accommodation to suit all budgets and a handful of excellent al fresco restaurants and bars.

One of the most agreeable introductions to the spectacular Chapada Diamantina begins at the river village of Remanso, a forty-minute drive from Lençóis. Here, it’s possible to canoe along a stretch of the mirror-like Rio San Antonio which courses through the dense, lush vegetation of a thirty-kilometre-square area of freshwater swampland. The Marimbus Wetland, as it’s known, has been favourably described as a ‘mini-Pantanal’; a comparison to Brazil’s famously wildlife-rich UNESCO listed wetland region. Among the creatures you may spot as you paddle amid Marimbus’ reeds and water-lilies are cranes, moorhens and host of other exotic birds.

A better option is to stop where the Rio San Antonio meets the Rio Roncador, where the sound of an interconnected series of waterfalls earns the latter its nickname, the ‘snoring river’. Whilst the sand that must be crossed to reach this beautiful oasis might scorch bare feet, the waterfalls and deep pools between them are perfect for swimming, diving and generally freshening up in.

From here, this region of unparalleled Brazilian beauty offers the opportunity to indulge in countless other exhilarating outdoor activities including climbing, trekking, cave exploration and snorkelling, potholing, bird and wildlife spotting and even traversing a lake by zip-wire.

Like the diamonds that may still lurk hidden in the ancient rock strata beneath its surface, Brazil’s Chapada Diamantina is just itching waiting to be discovered and the unique experiences and memories it offers are treasures worth more than any precious stone.

When to go

There is never a truly bad time to visit the Chapada Diamantina, although rainfall –in the form of heavy rain showers – is most common from November to early March. From April to July things become gradually drier and warmer and this is possibly the best time to visit unless you can tolerate the potentially blistering heat that may arrive in August to December’s ‘dry season’.

To start planning your tour to Chapada Diamantina and the rest of Brazil get in touch with one of our specialists on +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or send us an email here. Take a look at our tour suggestions in Brazil here.

make-an-enquiry

create-your-journey