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This traveler captured all 147 underground stations in Mexico City

 

Mexico City is geographically one of the biggest cities in the world, and the largest metropolitan area in the western hemisphere. It’s an astonishing 1,485 square kilometres with more than 8 million inhabitants and it is surprisingly, sits at quite a high elevation of 2,250 metres above sea level. It’s one of Latin America’s most interesting cities, with baroque Cathedrals, museums, colonial squares, and galleries including the Palacio Nacional which holds artwork by Diego Rivera.

It’s no surprise then that it has many underground stations to help commuters and travelers cross this vast city. Mexico City underground, called the Sistema de Transporte Colectivo, in second in size only to the New York City metro. It also carries the ninth largest number of tourists for any subway with a staggering 1.6 billion travelers riding the trains every year.

The Mexico City Metro is known as the Sistema de Transporte Colectivo or STC, and is the largest second largest metro system in North America after New York’s subway. As of 2015 it also ranked 9th in the world for number of passengers with 1.623 billion travellers riding the rails.

Flickr: 16:9clue

In 2011, 31-year-old Australian expat Peter Davies from Australia decided to visit and record all 147 underground stations. After travelling to over 20 countries in the Americas, Davies settled in Mexico City for a while. During his travels he’d lived in Valparaiso, worked as a volunteer project in Granada and wrote about his travels in online publications.

Over a 6-month period, Davies got off and explored every single station on every line on the Mexico City underground. This meant a visit to 175 stations, but many of these crossed over and the actual number was 147. He recorded these stops in great detail on his blog mexicocitymetro.com. The site was popular with over 100,000 visiting and following his updates. Along the way, Davies visited and saw some pretty wacky things including being led through crowds by stray dogs, visiting a museum housed inside an enormous model of Benito Juarez as well as photographing some incredible street art. This much travelling is hungry work. Plenty of street tacos were eaten along the way.

18 months after the end of the project, Davies revisited Mexico City to complete the new lines. His very last station on Line 12 was Estacion Lomas Estrella. In his last piece, the blogger takes a look at the graffiti, tries a torta cubana (a sandwich filled with meat, eggs and accompaniments), wandered the districts streets, saw a circus and talked about the amenities of Lomos Estrella. For now, Davies has left Mexico City and is working on other projects, but we are looking forward to his return after the creation of new underground stops in the city.

Want to explore Mexico City? Take a look at our Mexico tour suggestions, speak to one of our travel experts at +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or contact us by email here.

Visit 5 UNESCO World Heritage sites on this Yucatan self-drive

Self drive map

The Yucatán peninsula in eastern Mexico borders both Belize and Guatemala and offers a diverse range of flora, fauna and vast host of UNESCO World Heritage sites including the Mayan ruin of Chichén Itzá, now one of the ‘New Seven Wonders of the World’. The best way to visit the UNESCO ruins and colonial cities is by self-drive which offers the chance to spend as long or as little in each place you visit.

Arrive in Cancun, pick up your car hire and begin the journey. The first drive to Chichén Itzá takes around three hours.

Chichén Itzá

Chichen Itza MexicoThe remarkably well-preserved Mayan ruins of Chichén Itzá are one of the New Seven Wonders of the World. It’s best known for the huge step pyramid known as El Castillo. This ancient city thrived between 600 A.D. and 1,200. The complex includes a ball court, the Temple of the Warriors and the Wall of the Skulls all of which have graphic stone carvings. Each night, a sound and light show illuminates the complex.

Drive west for two hours to Merida.

Mérida

Merida Mexico

Flickr: Luiz Eduardo

Mérida is the capital of the Yucatan and one of the largest cities in Mexico and has the highest percentage of indigenous people of any Mexican city with over half the population being of Maya ethnicity. Though the city is not a UNESCO World Heritage site, this colonial city is well worth taking some time to explore.

Drive south for two hours to the ruins of Uxmal.

Uxmal

Uxmal Mexico

This ancient Mayan town founded in 700 A.D. once had over 25,000 inhabitants. The complex which was built between 700 and 1000 A.D. reveals that the people had knowledge of astronomy and includes the Pyramid of the Soothsayer, the Quadrangle of the Nuns, the Governor’s Palace, the House of the Tortoises, the Ball Court and ceremonial sites.

Drive for three hours to the coastal down of Campeche.

Campeche

The fortified harbor town of Campeche is a fine example of Spanish colonial architecture. The old city is surrounded by walls and a system of fortifications which are deigned to defend against piracy and attacks from the sea. It was once the most important seaport in Mexico and played a major role in the conquest of the Yucanatan Peninsula and Guatemala from the Spanish conquistadors.

Drive for four hours to Calakmal Municipality.

Calakmul Biosphere Reserve

The Calakmul Biosphere Reserve was only granted UNESCO World Heritage status in 2006. It remains the largest forest reserve in Mexico comprising of over 700,000 hectares of protected land. This is not untouched forest. The Mayans were some of the first group to live in the forests with the ruins of city complexes abandoned in 900 A.D. The group consists of the largest populations of flora and fauna in the country and includes the jaguar, puma, white-lipped peccary, howler monkey, king vulture, gray brocket deer and ornate hawk to name but a few.

Drive for four hours to Reserva de la Biósfera Sian-Ka’an.

Reserva de la Biósfera Sian-Ka’an

Flickr: DaseinDesign

Flickr: DaseinDesign

Sian-Ka-an means ‘Origin of the Sky’ in the language of the Mayan people who once inhabited the region. Located on the eastern coast of the Yucantan peninsula, the reserve is made up of a series of tropical forests, mangroves, marshes and a barrier reef. Inhabiting the reserve is a remarkable number of flora and fauna including 300 species of birds.

Drive an hour up the coast to Tulum.

Tulum

Tulum

The Mayan ruins of Tulum is not a UNESCO World Heritage site, but it’s well worth taking some time to explore them on the drive up the coast to Cancun. The ruins are situated on 12-metre high cliffs overlooking the ocean and were one of the last cities to be built by the Maya. It managed to hold off conquest by the Spanish for around 70 years but Old World diseases brought by the settlers resulted in the city being abandoned.

Continue up the coast for two hours to Cancun. Drop off the car hire and fly back home.

Want to take this self-drive? Get in touch with our Mexico travel experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478 to discuss your travel plans or see our example tours here.

10 prawn dishes you have to try on the Riviera Nayarit

The Riviera Nayarit lies along the western coast of Mexico. The beautiful region is known for its white sandy palm fringed beaches, laid back locals, luxurious hotels and most importantly, fresh seafood. It’s no surprise then that there are plenty of seafood dishes to try. If you love prawns, there’s simply no better place to eat. Here’s 10 prawn based dishes to try when you visit.

Tortitas de Camarón

Popular during Holy Week and Easter, this traditional dish of prawn patties cooked in a fresh spicy sauce made from chipotle chilies, tomatoes, garlic, onions and nopal cactus is delicious.

Empanadas de Camarón

Empanadas are popular throughout Latin America, the recipe and filling changing depending on the region visited. Similar to a Cornish pasty, these pockets of pastry are filled with prawns and cheese or a spicy casserole of prawns, tomatoes, onions and chili.

Camarones Zarandeados

This is a true Nayarit seafood classic. Prawns are cut in half and smoked using a secret recipe. It’s also common to find smoked octopus and other smoked fish.

Tamales de Camarón

Though tamales are sold on almost every street corner in Nayarit, head to the central coast of northern region of the state for the best.

Camarones a la Diabla

These deviled prawns are one of the simplest dishes, but pack a punch. Prawns are fried in butter and seasoning and then doused in ketchup and a spicy sauce. Perfect with a cold beer.

Coctel de Camarón

Most will have tried a prawn cocktail before, but in Nayarit its served spicy and hot. The prawn heads are ground down and added for extra flavor along with onions, tomatoes, cucumber and chilies.

Camarones a la Cucaracha

Though the name is unappealing (it translates to cockroach prawn), it’s got nothing to do with roaches! Prawns are coasted in seasoned flavor and fried until golden brown.

Ceviche de Camarón

A classic Latin American dish. Although this is not native to Nayarit, it’s one of the best places to try the dish. Raw prawns are marinated in lime juice, cucumber, onion, tomatoes and chili. Best served on a sunny afternoon near the beach.

Taxtihuil

This corn, prawn and chili stew is ancient. Originating from the Isla de Mexcanltitan, it’s been eaten in the region since pre-Hispanic times. It’s as popular now as it was then.

Aguachile

The origins of Aguachile is disputed between Nayarit and neighboring Sinaloa. A regional favourite, this recipe is created with lime, chili, garlic and seasoning which is poured over prawns, onions and cucumber.

If that’s not enough, we’ve got one more for you. We couldn’t create this list without mentioning tacos de camarón. There are plenty of varieties, but they all include tortillas heaped with prawns, mulata sauce, coriander, lime and habanero chilies.

Want to try any of these prawn dishes in the Riviera Nayarit? Get in touch with our Mexico travel experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478 to discuss your travel plans or see our example tours here.

With thanks to Riviera Nayarit.

Authentic Mexican carne asado taco recipe

Tacos are synonymous with Mexico. This classic recipe for carne asado (barbequed meat) tacos is one of the best we’ve tried. Cold Corona beer works perfectly as an accompaniment to this spicy street food.

Ingredients:

10 tortillas
500g skirt steak, cut into thin slices
4 chilies, chopped finely
6 garlic cloves, minced
1 tsp vinegar
2 tsp cumin
½ tsp ground cloves
Oil
3 tomatoes
2 large onion, chopped finely
2 handful of coriander, chopped finely
4 limes, 3 cut into wedges and 1 juiced
Oil
Seasoning to taste

Method:

Take a blender and add 2 of the chopped chilies, 2 chopped garlic, vinegar, ½ of the chopped onions, 1 teaspoon of cumin, the ground cloves, seasoning and a little olive oil to bind everything together. Blend into a paste.

Put the steak slices into a mixing bowl and add the blended paste. Mix well together, cover with cling film and leave to marinade in the fridge for at least 2 hours.

Put the tomatoes, ½ chopped onion, 2 of the chopped chilies, the rest of the garlic, 1 teaspoon of cumin, a handful of coriander, juiced lime, 3 tablespoons of olive oil and seasoning. Mix well together, cover in cling film and leave in the fridge until ready to serve.

If possible, spark up the barbeque. Once the coals have greyed, place the slices of steak on and cook for a couple of minutes on both sides. If you don’t have a barbeque, heat a griddle pan to a high heat and cook the steak for a few minutes on both sides.

Heat a frying pan and heat each tortilla until warm. To serve, put a tortilla on a plate, top with some of the steak, coriander, some chopped white onion and a little of the sauce. Squeeze some lime juice and serve with extra lima wedges.

Want to try carne asado tacos in Mexico? Get in touch with our Mexico travel experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478 to discuss your travel plans or see our example tours here.

2017 Latin America travel bucket list

Thinking of travelling to Latin America in 2017? With such a huge area spanning two continents, we thought we’d put together a handy list of the most bucket list worthy things to do in Latin America. From hiking through the Andes to watching turtles on the beaches of Costa Rica, the area really does have something for everyone.

Wander through Tikal, Guatemala

tikal-889761_960_720

The ancient ruins of Tikal were built and occupied by the Maya civilization for over a thousand years and is one of the most impressive ruins in all of Latin America. The sprawling complex has over 3,000 structures, some of which are in remarkable good condition. You’ll feel like Indiana Jones as you wander through the ancient site surrounded by thick jungle and the sounds of howling monkeys and birds.

See penguins in the Antarctic

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One of the most bucket list worthy travel adventures on the planet. Take to one of the limited expedition vessels and head out to explore the white continent. There are plenty of penguin species to see including the cheeky chinstraps and gentoos, and the more impressive kings and emperors, the latter usually requires an adventurous helicopter flight to reach them. There is no where on earth as pristine as the Antarctic. While breathtaking is an overused word, there really is no other way to describe the landscapes of towering icebergs, glistening glaciers and majestic fjords.

Hang glide over Rio de Janeiro, Brazil

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Most visit sun kissed Rio de Janeiro for the relaxed pace where the caipirinhas flow and the beach is always appealing. Inject a little adventure and see the city from a new perspective by taking a hang glide. Don’t worry, you won’t be doing it alone. Your guide will fly while you can take the time to take in the surroundings. Take off from the top of Tijuca National Park forest and glide around getting excellent views of the city, beaches and Christ the Redeemer before effortlessly landing on the beach below.

Hike the Salkantay, Peru

Flickr: vil.sandi

Flickr: vil.sandi

While the Inca Trail has become the most popular hiking route to reach Machu Picchu, visitors often forget that there are many other trails. The Salkantay Trek is much less hiked and arguably more scenic (it’s been voted one of the 25 best hikes in the world). It’s also challenging. Those who take on the trek will have to reach some of the highest parts of the Humantay Mountain crossing passes higher than 6,000 metres. But those who do are rewarded with some extraordinary views of snow-capped peaks.

See the wildlife in the Pantanal, Brazil

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The wildlife in the Pantanal rivals that of the Amazon. The difference is the wildlife in these vast wetlands are much easier to spot than the thick jungle. Visitors first drive down the famous Transpantaneira Road stopping to watch crossing caiman and nearby bird life. Once in the wetlands, visitors can stay at any one of the comfortable lodges and take daily excursions by foot, horseback, boat or 4×4 to see wildlife including giant otters, anacondas, caimans, monkeys, marsh deer, tapirs and many species of bird, herons and egrets to hawks and macaws. It’s even possible to see a jaguar from some of the deeper Pantanal lodges.

Scuba dive off Fernando do Noronha, Brazil

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While South American isn’t known for its marine life as say Asia or Australasia, there are still some excellent spots. Fernando do Noronha Islands lies off the coast of northern Brazil. Here the marine life is abundant and its possible to scuba dive or snorkel with colourful schools of fish, lobsters, manta rays, baby sharks and octopus.

Swim with whale sharks off Holbox Island, Mexico

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Our top pick for things to do in Latin America. Whale sharks visit the Holbox Island off Mexico for just a couple of months each year. These huge behemoths are the largest fish in the world and while it may seem scary to snorkel with huge sharks, they are harmless to humans. These gentle giants open their large mouths to filter krill and plankton from the oceans.

Watch hatching baby turtles in Tortuguero, Costa Rica

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Tortuguero National Park on Costa Rica’s northern Caribbean coast are a nature-lovers’ paradise. Cut off from the rest of the country, a plane or boat is the only way to access the region. It’s one of the world’s best places to see green turtles as they come ashore at night to lay their eggs in the sand. Later in the year those young break out of their shells and make the brave journey along the beach to the sea.

Hike to the Lost City, Colombia

Flickr: Andrew Hyde

Flickr: Andrew Hyde

Machu Picchu is undoubtable the most recognizable of ruins in Latin America, but Colombia’s Lost City is just as impressive and with far fewer tourists. To reach the uncrowded ruins, one must take a 4 day hike through thick forest and climb 1,200 steps. Along the way sleep in hammocks in local villages. It’s not unusual to arrive at the Lost City and be the only ones there. Go before this Lost City doesn’t feel quite as lost.

Horse ride with Gauchos in Las Pampas, Argentina

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Whether you are a beginner or advanced rider, all are welcome to visit the Argentine grasslands of Las Pampas. Spend your days with the cowboys of South America, riding through the steppe, rounding cattle, listening to their folklore stories around campfires and sampling some hearty Argentine barbeques. There are plenty of luxurious homestays for those who want a little more comfort on their stay.

To start planning your ultimate bucket list tour of Latin America, speak to one of our travel experts on +(0) 207 407 1478 or email us here.

Interesting facts about Mexico you probably didn’t know

Mexico City

  1. 31 states and Mexico City make up the country officially known as the United Mexican States (Estados Únidos Mexicanos)
  2. Mexico has over 117 million people making it the 11th most populated country
  3. In terms of land, Mexico is the 14th largest in the world
  4. There are over 30 UNESCO World Heritage sites in Mexico
  5. The national symbol of Mexico is the golden eagle
  6. Mexico has hosted the World Cup twice, once in 1970 and then again in 1986
  7. Tools found in Mexico suggest humans have inhabited the area for around 23,000 years
  8. The biggest cat in Mexico is the jaguar
  9. The world’s smallest dog is the Chihuahua and is named after the Mexican state
  10. Mexico City is built on a lake and is sinking at around 6 inches a year
  11. Modern Mexicans are made up of Olmec, Toltec, Maya, Aztec, Inca, Zapotec, French and Spanish among others
  12. The USA/Mexico border is the second longest in the world
  13. Mexico City is one of the largest cities in the world
  14. Mexico has the second most Catholics behind Brazil
  15. The Mayans used hornets’ nest to throw as their enemies during battles
  16. Mexico is home to the world’s smallest volcano, standing at just 13 metres tall
  17. The bloodythirsty Aztecs played a ballgame called tlachtli. The loser was sacrificed
  18. Chitchen Itza is named as one of the Seven Wonders of the World
  19. Over 50 different languages are spoken in Mexico
  20. The Great Pyramid of Cholula is the largest monument ever constructed
  21. The rare volcano rabbit lives near the volcanoes of Mexico
  22. Chocolate, chilies and corn all come from Mexico
  23. Texas was a part of Mexico until 1836 before declaring independence
  24. The Spanish Conquistador Hernan Cortés was believed to be a returning god when he arrived in 1519 and was offered hot chocolate
  25. The first printing press came from Mexico City in the early 16th century
  26. Mexican children receive gifts on the 6th January, not on Christmas Day
  27. The oldest university in North America is in Mexico City and was founded in 1551
  28. The country is located on one of the earth’s most volatile volcano and earthquake zones
  29. There are some similarities between the ancient Aztec language and English – avocados are ahuacatl, tomatoes are tomatl and chocolate is chocolatl
  30. Mexico was under the control of the Spanish for over 300 years

To discover Mexico for yourself, contact one of our travel experts on +(0) 207 407 1478 or email us here.

Delicious Baja-style Mexican fish taco recipes

Flickr: Barb Watson

Flickr: Barb Watson

They may be a bit of a faff to make, but you won’t be disappointed with these delicious Baja-style fish tacos. Get everything prepared, so once the fish has been fried you can serve up straight away. For a little more zing add extra lime juice and a few hot chillies.

We love to hear about your creations or new Latin American recipes. Head over to our Facebook to share photos and recipe ideas.

Serves: 6 people
Time: 1 hour

Ingredients

Batter
130g plain flour
1 small bottle of bear
A pinch of salt
Black pepper

Sauce
100mls sour cream
100mls crème fraiche
3tbs lime juice
zest of 1 lime
A pinch of salt
Black pepper

Salsa
2 large tomatoes, finely chopped
1 cucumber, finely chopped
1 red onion, finely chopped
1 large chilli, finely chopped
1 lime, juice squeezed
1tbs oil
A pinch of salt
Black pepper

Fried fish
1kg halibut, skinned and cut widthways into 1cm strips
100g plain flour
Oil
A pinch of salt
Black pepper

The rest, to serve
Corn tortillas
Jalapenos
200g shredded cabbage
Handful of coriander, roughly chopped

Method

  1. Start by making the batter. Sieve the flour into a large bowl and add the seasoning. Gradually stir in the beer and mix until lump free. Leave in the fridge until use.
  2. To make the sauce, mix both the sour cream and crème fraiche in a large bowl. Add the lemon juice, zest and seasoning and mix thoroughly. Leave in the fridge until use.
  3. Combine all the ingredients in a bowl and mix thoroughly. Leave in the fridge until use.
  4. Put a large frying pan on a high heat and add oil half way up. While the oil heats, put the mix the flour and seasoning on a large plate. Take the batter out of the fridge. Add a little salt and pepper to the fish fillets. Coat each fillet with the flour mix and then dip into the batter. Carefully drop into the hot oil and cook for 3 minutes at which point the batter should be golden. Use a slotted spoon to remove the fish and leave them on paper towels to drain.
  5. Heat the tortillas quickly in a dry frying pan. To serve place the tortilla on a plate and lay one or two pieces of the fried fish. Top with the sauce, salsa, shredded cabbage, chopped coriander and jalapenos and serve immediately. For extra zing, squeeze a little lime juice over the top.

Fresh fried tacos are best served with cold bottles of Mexican beer along accompanied by a wedge of fresh lime.

Want to try real fish tacos in Baja California or explore Mexico’s rich food heritage? No problem. Call us today on +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or message us here to begin planning your trip. One of our Mexican experts will be on hand to talk you through the various options and provide inspiration for the trip.

Mexican menudo roja recipe

Menudo recipe

Menudo is a hearty Mexican soup made from tripe (beef stomach) and plenty of chili. While tripe is not the most popular or appealing of ingredients, it is cheap, nutritious and if prepared property, delicious. You can find both tripe and pigs trotters in all good butchers. Serve this with plenty of corn tortillas, and if possible leave the dish to cool overnight and reheat for better flavor.

Serves: 6
Time: 4 hours

Ingredients

1kg tripe
2 pig trotters
2 lts water
1 onion
1 garlic bulb
1 handful of coriander with roots
1 tbs peppercorns
2 bay leaves
2 tps cumin seeds
3 tps dried oregano
5 small red chilies
salt
4 tbs vinegar
2 cans of hominy
1 handful dried guajillo chilies
1 tbs sugar

Method

Clean you tripe thoroughly in cold water and trim any excess fat away. In a large pot add cold water and bring to the boil before adding the pig trotters and tripe. After 10 minutes, pour away the water and add more water, chopped onion, garlic bulb, coriander, peppercorns, bay leaves, half the cumin, half the oregano, half the vinegar and the red chillies. Cover the pot and simmer for 2 hours before allowing it to cool.

Next remove the tripe and cut into strips. Take the meat off the trotters and discard the bones and fat. Strain the liquid through a sieve, keeping for future use, and discarding the solids. Add the meat, tripe and strained liquid back to the pot. Take the dried chillies and with a little salt grind them in a pestle and mortar until a paste has formed. Add to the pot along with the canned hominy. Add the remaining spices, vinegar, a little crushed garlic and season to taste. Simmer for another couple of hours until the soup is thickened.

Serve with plenty of hot corn tortillas and some wedges of lime.

Want to try the real deal? Take a look at our suggested tours of Mexico.

If you are a wildlife lover you shouldn’t miss out on these amazing experiences

Latin America is full of wonders. The diverse landscapes make for an equally diverse set of species. Roaming jaguars, gentle whale sharks, lazy sloths and colourful quetzals, to name just a few. Here are videos of some of the most amazing wildlife experiences you can have in Latin America.

Flamingos at Laguna Colorado, Bolivia

This high altiplano lakes are commonly visited after a tour of the Uyuni Salt Flats in southern Bolivia. The bright red lake is home to a huge flock of flamingos which often break out into mass flight. The mountainous backdrop and vivid lake make for excellent photography opportunities.

Colourful quetzals in Boquete, Panama

Part of the trogon family, these colourful birds are found in the humid highland forests in Central America. One of the best places to spot quetzals is along the Quetzal Trail in Boquete, a highland town in western Panama. They are largely solitary and relatively hard to spot, making them all the more satisfying when seeing one for the first time.

Snorkelling with whale sharks in Isle Holbox, Mexico

Whale sharks come to Holbox Island off Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula in numbers reaching 800 to feed on the water rich plankton and krill. A rarity, as whale sharks are generally solitary creatures. Whales sharks are the largest fish in the world reaching lengths of up to 15 metres and a weight of up to 15 tons. Snorkelling with these gentle giants, which are harmless to humans, is a magical experience. To snorkel with whale sharks, visit between mid-May and mid-September.

Watching the mating dance of the waved albatross in the Galapagos, Ecuador

Every April almost the entire adult population of the waved albatross return to Española (Hood Island), Galapagos in order to breed. At the visitor site of Punta Suarez, you can see their amusing courtship display including ‘bill-circling’, ‘sky-pointing’, ‘drunken swagger’ and ‘bill-clapping’. This flamboyant ritual dancing enables the birds to re-establish their pairs or the young to find their partner. It is the only time the birds come ashore.

Riding water buffalo on Marajó Island, Brazil

Marajó is a huge island, roughly the size of Switzerland, located where the Amazon meets the Atlantic.This is cowboy country, but instead of horses, large herds of water buffalo have been domesticated. These docile creatures are not native to South America, coming originally from Asia. Riding water buffalos is an excellent way to explore the island, but it isn’t just for tourists. The creatures are used for farming, transporting goods and even by the police to patrol the streets. An essential part of Marajó life.

See condors gliding below you at Colca Canyon, Peru

An unmissable wildlife experience in Peru, this majestic creatures sit on the rocks around Cruz del Condor and circle above and inside Colca Canyon catching the morning thermals. The experience has the bonus of also being able to look over the views of the Colca Canyon, which is deeper than the Grand Canyon in the US.

Noisy howler monkeys in the Amazon

Howler monkeys are found throughout the Amazon, but the most accessible spots are the lodges near Puerto Maldonado in Peru, near Manaus in Brazil and near Coca in Ecuador. The are considered the loudest land animal in the world, their sound can be heard for up to three miles. It is thought their howling is used for territory protection and mating calls.

Attacking orcas on the beaches of the Valdes Peninsula, Argentina

In Argentina’s Valdes Peninsula in Patagonia, orcas attack basking sea lion pups on the beaches between February and March. This spectacular hunting technique puts the orcas at risk of permanently beaching themselves. The area is also excellent for spotting dolphins and southern right whales.

Roaming jaguars in the Pantanal, Brazil

Jaguars are elusive creatures, but Porto Jofre in the Brazil’s Pantanal wetlands are one of the best places to see them. They often roam the river banks in search of prey such as caiman or capybaras. Although spotting jaguars here cannot be guaranteed, a day or two spent on boats along the river here often leads to sightings.

Whale watching in Baja California, Mexico

The warm, krill rich waters around Baja California, a peninsula in Mexico’s north west is home to many species of whale. However, the highlight is the curious gray whale which often comes up close to the boat and allows visitors to pat it. Other whales seen fluking are blue, fin, humpback, sperm, Bryde’s, and pilot whales. Dolphins are also a common sighting here.

Love wildlife? Want to start planning a wildlife adventure in Latin America? Get in touch with us today.

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