(0)20 7407 1478

855 625 2753 US

Monthly Archives: October 2017

Join us at the Luxury Travel Fair

We are pleased to announce that next week from 2 – 5 November we shall be at the Luxury Travel fair at Olympia, London. Come & feel inspired by one of the talks which take place every day including, critic and TV presenter Giles Coren, Planet Earth 2 Producer, Chadden Hunter, The Natural Navigator Tristan Gooley & Author Lord Norwich who will be talking about their travel experiences in a Q&A with members of the Condé Nast Traveler Editorial Team. You can also come and talk to us on Stand E31 about planning your trip to the Galapagos, Antarctica or Latin America. For free entrance go to the Luxury Travel Fair website and use the code: LTEX062.

RELATED: Our picks for the 2018 hotspots in Latin America

Should you pick Ambergris Caye or Caye Caulker

Whether to visit Ambergris Caye or Caye Caulker is a question that every travellers who goes to Belize faces. Both lie in the Caribbean Sea just a few miles from each other and the mainland of Belize, but they are a world apart from each other in many ways. It’s a tricky one as both have their merits, and it really comes down to personal taste, and perhaps budget. Some people will defend the smaller Caye Caulker for its laid back atmosphere, while others will push for the nightlife and things to do on Ambergris Caye. Here’s everything you need to know to make the right decision for you.

Caye Caulker

Caye Caulker is the smallest of the two, at just 5 miles long and 1 mile wide, though in parts just100 metres wide or so. When you arrive on the island, you have a couple of choices for getting to your hotel – walk or golf buggy taxis. No vehicles are allowed on the island. During the high season, there are around 40 little hotels and guest houses, as well as a couple of dozen restaurants and bars, which close fairly early. It’s got a laid back atmosphere, with tiny little beaches flanked by shallow and calm aquamarine waters. Though it’s 5 miles long, much of the island is inaccessible due to dense mangroves. The island buildings are colourful wooden Caribbean shacks. Days can be spent on the little spits on beach, swimming or snorkelling in the ocean, paddle boarding or sea kayaking, or eating in the local restaurants. Towards the top of main island, there is ‘the split’, a break in the island caused by a hurricane in the 70’s. There are only 1,500 or so permanent residents on the island, though this swells with tourists during the high season.

Ambergris Caye

Ambergris Caye is much larger, with a population 10 times the size of Caye Caulker. It stretches for 25 miles and is up to a mile wide. The main town of San Pedro is much bigger than its Caye Caulker counterpart with hundreds of hotels and guest houses on offer. There are also countless bars and restaurants offering everything from Belizean to Italian cuisine. Ambergris Caye doesn’t have any cars either, but unlike Caye Caulker, the distances can be far, so it’s worth hiring a golf buggy to get around. Ambergris Caye is much more built up with large concrete buildings. The clubs and bars teem with tourists that spill out onto the beach and offer live music and cold drinks.

Both cayes offer access to the Belize Barrier Reef, the second largest reef in the world after Australia’s Great Barrier Reef, so this shouldn’t sway your decision. In conclusion, if you are looking for a quiet holiday in a more charming location, and don’t mind the lack of beaches or the limited variety of restaurants and bars, Caye Caulker is your island. If more choice for restaurants and nightlife is important, and you don’t mind the quicker pace, later nights, and noise, then stay on Ambergris Caye.

To visit either Caye Caulker, Ambergris Caye, or any other part of Belize, call or travel experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or email us here.

RELATED: Luxury boltholes you won’t want to miss in Belize

How to spend the perfect day in Puerto Vallarta

The sleepy city of Puerto Vallarta has been drawing in tourists for more than 50 years. It was brought to international attention during the filming of John Huston’s ‘The Night of the Iguana’. The beautiful colonial architecture, cobbled streets, white sandy beaches, and friendly locals have been charming visitors since the 1960s, and has largely managed to stay fairy undeveloped compared to other Mexican coastal cities. If you find yourself in the city, here’s how to spend the perfect day.

9 a.m.

Start the day right with a visit to Coco’s Kitchen located in the old town. This Puerto Vallarta institution serves up some of the best breakfasts in town including crispy churros, omelettes stuffed with ham, cheese, mushrooms, and sausage. Be sure to try the huevos rancheros, a hearty plate of fried tortillas, fried eggs, refried beans, and salsa. Wash everything down with the restaurant’s signature mimosas.

10 a.m.

Flickr: smcgee

After breakfast, hop in the rental car or taxi and drive out to the Puerto Vallarta Botanical Gardens, a half hour drive outside the city. Nestled in the Sierra Madre mountains, these beautiful gardens are teeming with rare orchids, hummingbirds, and butterflies. Wander through the sunny gardens. It’s a wonderful way to while away the morning.

1 p.m.

Arrive back in the old town. By this time, you will have worked up a bit of an appetite. Dotted across Puerto Vallarta are little taco stands. Pull up a pew and order a couple of the meat tacos. Little flour tortillas are topped with shredded beef, salsa, chili, fresh cheese, and sauce. It’s going to get messy. There is no way to eat these politely, but they are delicious. Most sell refrescos, icy cold fruit juices. Hungry afterwards? Order another or head for the nearest seafood taco stand.

2 p.m.

After all that food, it’s time for a little rest and relaxation. Head down to Olas Altas or Los Muertos, the two nearest beaches to town, and work on the tan or swim in the sea. The beaches in Puerto Vallarta never get busy, so you’ll always be able to find a private little spot. Have a siesta or cool off in the Pacific Ocean. If you are feeling a little more energetic, you can rent some surf boards or body boards nearby and hit the waves. Alternatively, if you are not a beach dweller, head off the explore the beautiful architecture of the old town.

5 p.m.

The Malecon is a series of boardwalks which span a mile or so along the coast. It makes for a beautiful walk as you watch the sun setting and are cooled by the sea breeze. There are some interesting sculptures to see along the way, as well as little shops, bars, and restaurants. Towards the end of the boardwalk, there is a concrete pier underneath which a vendor sells seafood. Pick from the huge pile of fresh oysters, cover in lime juice and chili sauce, bury your feet into the sand and dig in.

8 p.m.

Flickr: sadaqah

Head up to La Palapa Restaurant nearby. Not only does the beachfront restaurant enjoy some particularly good views over the beach and ocean, they also serve up some incredibly fresh seafood from grilled lobster tails, barbecued tuna steaks covered in lime juice, or prawn tacos. The cocktails here are pretty good as well.

10 p.m.

Wander back to Mango’s Beach Club. As the name suggests, the bar is nestled right on the sand. Here they have an extensive cocktail menu (the margaritas are particularly good), as well as having live music at weekends. If you visit between Monday and Thursday, they often have two for one drinks available. The perfect way to finish your day in Puerto Vallarta.

Staying for more than one day? There is plenty more to do in the surrounding area. The little town of Sayulita is located around a half hour up the road and offers some of the best surfing in the area. There are several surf schools if you want to learn. The Islas Marietas National Park are some 8 miles of the mainland. Daily excursions will take you out to snorkel with the rich marine life or explore the underground beach. For a restaurant with a view, look up the Ocean Grill, a wooden restaurant built onto the side of a cliff edge overlooking the sea. To reach it, you will need to either hike across a thick bit of jungle or take the restaurant’s water taxi around the bay from Boca de Tomatlan.

Want to go to Puerto Vallarta? Start planning your tour by calling one of our Mexican travel experts on +44 (0) 207 1478 or email here with your request here.

RELATED: 6 Gastronomic Experiences in Mexico

Authentic Mexican steak quesadilla recipe

Flickr: Hungry Dudes

Quesadillas are a street food favourite in Mexico. The basic recipe are floury tortillas toasted with cheese, but they can be filled with everything at the back of the fridge. Their origins stem back to the colonial Mexico, though the recipe has changed and evolved somewhat over the years. Here’s our authentic recipe including steak, a luxurious version of the humble quesadilla.

Serves: 4
Time: 30 minutes

Ingredients

8 flour tortillas
½ kilo sirloin steak
1 medium onion, finely chopped
400 grams Mexican cheese
2 avocados
1 lime
Vegetable oil
Salt & pepper

Method

Add a little of the oil to a frying pan and heat over a medium flame. Add the chopped onion and fry until soft and translucent.

While the onions are cooking, chop the steak into thin slices and season with salt and pepper. Add the meat to the frying pan and cook with the onions for a few minutes until the meat has browned.

Grate the cheese. Lay out four of the tortillas on a clean surface. Add one quarter of the steak and onion mix onto each tortillas, and top each one with a quarter of the grated cheese. Add the other tortillas on top.

Clean at the frying pan and place back on the heat. Don’t add oil this time. When the frying pan has heated, carefully life the quesadilla onto the frying pan and leave to toast on one side. It should take a couple of minutes. Flip carefully with a spatula and toast the other side allowing the cheese to fully melt. You can press the tortilla gently on the top to help it cook and seal everything together. Take out when the cheese starts to ooze out.

Quickly cut in half and top with a squeeze of lime and top with sliced avocado. Eat immediately while the melted cheese is hot. Optional extras include topping the quesadilla with fresh zingy salsa and Mexican cream.

RELATED: Argentine empanada recipe

Interesting spots for art lovers in Latin America

The Museo de Arte Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires (MALBA)

Flickr: Helen K

The Museo de Art Latinoamericano de Buenos Aires (shortened to MALBA) is a World-class gallery. Located along Figueroa Alcorta Avenue in Palermo, the museum houses a wealth of Latin American art within a contemporary structure. Works from artists including Antonio Berni, Joaquin Torres Garcia, and Diego Rivera and amongst many others. The MALBA was inaugurated in 2001 with the mission to collect, preserve, and promote Latin American art. It receives well over a million visitors every year making it one of the highest visited museums on the continent.

The Blue House, Frida Kahlo Museum

Flickr: ::: Mer :::

More commonly known as the Blue House (La Casa Azul), the Frida Kahlo Museum is in Colonia del Carmen in Mexico City. The cobalt blue museum was the home of the artist. It was here she was born, created much of her art, lived with her husband Diego Rivera, and ultimately died. It chronicles her life, and has much of her artwork. Most of the building has be left exactly as it was when Frida lived there in the 1950’s.

The Last Supper in Cuzco

Wikipedia: Toño Zapata

Adorning the walls of the cathedral in Cuzco, there is a replica of The Last Supper. It was painting in the 18th century by a Peruvian artist called Marcos Zapata. The interesting thing about the painting is the Andean influence. You will notice that the table is filled with Peruvian foods including corn, peppers, different coloured potatoes, chicha (a fermented corn drink), and roasted cuy (guinea pig). At the forefront, Judas can be seen holding a bag of money, but this is commonly considered to be modelled on Francisco Pizarro, the Spanish conquistador who executed the Inca Emperor hundreds of years before.

The Selaron Steps in Rio de Janerio

The Escadaria Selarón, more commonly called the Selaron Steps, are one of the most visited spots in Rio de Janeiro. Built by Chilean artist Jorge Selaron as a tribute to the Brazilian people, what started as a side project to his other work turned into an obsession that took years to create. There are 215 steps descending 125 metres and are covered with more than 2,000 tiles collected from around the world. Each step is unique creating an ever-evolving piece of art. 300 or so of the tiles are hand painted by Selaron.

The street art in Bogota

Flickr: McKay Savage

Street art has become popular across Latin America in recent years. One of the best places to see this modern art form is on the streets of Colombia’s capital, Bogota. Though you can see work adorning many of the streets, the best sports are along Calle 26 in the La Canderlaria neighbourhood, and Chapinero. The city has a dark history, and much of the work is about politics and social commentary. Local and international street artists like Banksy, Stinkfish, Vhils, and Toxicomano have all painted the walls here.

Want to see the art for yourself? Start planning your trip today by calling one of our Latin American experts on +44 (0) 207 1478 or email us here.

RELATED: French artist projects faces of Amazon tribe onto rainforest canopy

What to eat in Nicaragua

Flickr: Adam Cohn

Nicaragua is fast becoming to hottest destination in Latin America. The Central American country is flanked on both sides by the Caribbean and Pacific Oceans, and is known for its dramatic landscapes of towering smoky volcanoes, golden sand beaches, and glistening lakes. It also has a rich history, and glorious Spanish colonial architecture, particularly in the southern city of Granada. We’ve just launched the country as a new destination, so to celebrate we’ll be publishing a series of articles on the culture and history. Most are unsure about what Nicaraguan food is all about, so here’s a typical day in food.

Breakfast in Nicaragua

Flickr: hollykathryn

Breakfast in Nicaragua is a hearty affair. Typically, gallo pinto is the stable breakfast dish found in very restaurant across the land. Translating to ‘spotted roster’, gallo pinto is simply rice and beans cooked with fried onions and garlic. On the Caribbean coast, the rice is cooked in coconut milk. It’s served with fried or scrambled eggs, and sometimes comes with Nicaraguan cheese, fried plantain, and tortillas. On Sundays, be sure to try nacatamales, traditional cornmeal tamales wrapped in banana leaves and filled with pork, rice, and vegetables. They are usually found being sold from people’s homes. If you’re staying in a hotel or you visit an upmarket restaurant, your breakfast will usually come with plenty of exotic fresh fruit and juices. Wash everything down with plenty of Nicaraguan black coffee.

Lunch in Nicaragua

Nicaraguans take the time for a big lunch, and there are plenty of dishes to choose from. If you’re near the coast or Lake Ometepe, try the guapote, deep fried while fish covered in mango, tomatoes, and lime. Alternatively, try vigorón, shredded cabbage mixed with tomatoes, onions, chilis, vinegar, and salt. This is topped with boiled yuca and chicharones (fried pork belly). Corn is another stable in Nicaragua, so if you’re looking for something light for lunch, try the grilled corn on the cob sold from vendors on every street corner, delicious covered with lime salt. Quesadillas, tortillas stuffed with cheese, are also popular street snacks.

Dinner in Nicaragua

In the evening try indio viejo, a mouth watering stew of meat, onions, tomatoes, peppers, and mint. Usually mobbed up with plenty of warm tortillas. Sopa de mondongo is a hearty soup made from cow tripe, onions, achiote chilies, ayote, garlic, yucca, and sour oranges. Even if you aren’t a fan of tripe (stomach lining), give this a go. It might just change your mind. Wash all this down with cold cervezas. Try the local Nicaraguan Tona or La Victoria Bufalo, both of which are excellent. Alternatively, el macua is a popular cocktail made from rum, lemon juice, guavas, and sugar. A must try for an visit to the country. Before you go to bed, try a pinolillo, a hot chocolate drink made from toasted corn, cacao power, milk, sugar, and spiced with cinnamon and cloves.

Would you like to try the food in Nicaragua? To start planning your trip to the country, take a look at our Nicaraguan suggested tours, call one of our travel experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478, or email us here.

RELATED: Top 8 things to do in Nicaragua

Videos of the most magnificent birds in Latin America

Latin America has the most diverse range of avifauna on earth. More than 3,000 different species of birdlife can be found from the mountains down to the coast. Notably places birders should visit are the Galapagos Islands in Ecuador, the cloud forests of Peru, the Atlantic coastal forest in Brazil, the Iberá Wetlands in Argentina, and the Boquete Highlands in Panama. Here’s a rundown of the most magnificent birds in Latin America that all birders should tick off their lists.

Hyacinth macaws

The hyacinth macaw is part of the parrot family and is native to the rainforests of South America. It is characterized by its cobalt blue feathers. It is the largest of the parrot family at maturity can reach up to a metre long from its head to the bottom of its tail. Unfortunately, due to habitat loss and the illegal pet trade, hyacinth macaws are listed as vulnerable. We can recommend spots in the Pantanal where you will definitely see them.

Andean condors

Andean condors inhabit much of the high Andes Mountains. It’s large, with a wingspan off well over 3 metres and is part of the vulture family. They circle on the thermals looking out for dead animals to scavenge. It has one of the longest lives of any bird, with some living to over 70 years. Perhaps one of the best places to see this impressive bird is in Peru’s Colca Canyon.

Cock of the Rock

Though small, the cock of the rock is one of the most colourful birds in Latin America. Inhabiting the misty cloud forests on the slopes of the Andes, these birds are characterized by bright orange feathers including a prominent fan-shaped crest. They congregate in leks where the males display in the hope of attracting a mate. If you want to see a cock of the rock, be sure to visit the cloud forests of Ecuador or Manu in Peru.

Waved albatross

These huge 2.5 metre birds descend upon Espanola island in the Galapagos during the mating season in May. Most visit the island to view the majestic birds’ mating ritual of bill circling, sky pointing, and bill clapping. The rest of the year they spend along the coast of Peru and Ecuador. Interestingly, the waved albatross can live up to 45 years.

Resplendent quetzal

The resplendent quetzal is found in the cloud forests of Panama, Guatemala, Mexico, and Costa Rica. There are several different sub-species, and they are often considered by many as the most beautiful birds in the world. These solitary creatures are part of the trogon family and are usually found on their own or very small groups.

Magnificent frigatebirds

Magnificent frigatebirds have a large wingspan and are known for stealing the food from other birds. This has led to the Spanish calling the pirate birds. The males have a layer of shiny black feathers along their body and a large red throat pouch which they inflate during mating season to attract a mate. Females are large then the males, and have white breast and shoulder feathers.

Blue footed boobies

Though blue footed boobies can be found along the coast of Ecuador and Peru, the biggest populations are on the Galapagos Islands, and are one of the archipelago’s biggest draws. They are easily recognised by their blue feet which they stamp up and down to impress a female. They reach almost a metre in height (the females are generally taller) and they have a wingspan of up to 1.5 metres.

King penguins

Most of the population of king penguins are found in the Antarctic, but there is a small population of king penguins on the Falkland Islands and another in Tierra del Fuego. King penguins are around a metre tall and are expert swimmers. While looking for prey like small fish and quid, they often dive down to over 100 metres, though some reach depths three times this.

Harpy eagles

The beautiful harpy eagle is found throughout the Americas and is one of the most powerful raptor species. They can be seen in parts of the lowland rainforests in Brazil and Central America gliding around on the morning thermal. They have huge talons which they use to grab prey and can lift animals that are as heavy as they are.

Capuchinbird

This funny looking bird is found in Northern Brazil and Guyana. It’s part of the cotingidae family and is famous among birders as having one of the most unique vocalisations, a low rumble like a cow. It’s got a strange head formation which makes it easy to spot.

Want to see the bird life of Latin America? To start planning, call one of our birding experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or email us here.

RELATED: 9 beautiful exotic birds from Latin America

A typical day in the Galapagos Islands

The Galapagos archipelago lies off the Ecuadorian mainland and is home to some of the most fascinating wildlife on the planet. It’s isolated location, lack of predators, a little contact with humans over thousands of years has helped the fearless wildlife flourish. Nowhere else on earth can you see some a range of species, from flightless cormorants, penguins, and giant tortoises that roam around on the highlands, while sharks, dolphins, and whales take refuge in the plankton rich waters. Without a doubt, the easiest way to see the island is on board one of the many cruise ships.  No day is the same, with new experiences and wildlife found on every island and site, but a typical day looks something like this.

In the morning, you will wake up to the sounds of sea birds and the gentle lapping of the ocean. Up on deck, you’ll likely to get you first sight of birds which circle around the boat above. Your crew will already have been up early creating a spread of eggs, toast, fresh fruits, yogurts, cereals, juice, and coffee for your breakfast.  You’ll have some time to eat and get ready before the excursion begins. During breakfast, your guide will give you a briefing of the day, what you’re likely to see, and what you’ll need to bring with you.

Board pangas (inflatable boats), to and cross over for either a wet or dry-landing. If wet, you’ll jump out into the water and wade through onto the beach. During a dry landing, the boat will moor up and allow you to step ashore. Which one depends on the site you are visiting. Once on shore, your naturalist guide will take you on a walk, perhaps up to a viewpoint. Along the way, you’ll likely to see everything from noisy sea lion colonies, blue-footed boobies doing their hilarious mating dance, great frigatebirds expanding their colourful red poach, iguanas basking in the sunshine, and waddling penguins. Your guide will help you identify the species, as well as the flora of the island. Back at the shore, you can don snorkel masks and fins and jump into the sea to explore the marine life of turtles, small reef sharks, and colourful schools of fish.

Having worked up an appetite, you’ll board pangas to ride back to the boat. The chef will have been busy preparing a delicious buffet style lunch which typically includes pastas, meat, cheese, bread, vegetables, and some dessert, along with fresh fruit and juices. You’ll have a little time to relax as the boat cruises on to the next destination.

You’ll motor to a new site which will reveal a whole host of new species to discover. For example on Santa Cruz island, you’ll head up the windy roads to the lush green highlands. With your ever present guide, you’ll hike through the greenery in search of some of the island’s giant Galapagos tortoises. They move slowly, so they’re never hard to find. Enjoy close encounters with alien-looking but gentle ambling creatures.

Return to the coast. If time permits, you’ll be taken to another site for some snorkelling. In the cool waters, perhaps spot large manta ray, a colourful parrot fish, a green turtle, or a playful sea lion pup whose inquisitiveness with bring them up close to you. The underwater life in the Galapagos is simply astounding, with rare coral reefs and fascinating marine creatures. You may even spot the odd harmless reef shark gracefully swimming. As always, your naturalist guide will be with you to help you spot and identify the flora and fauna species. With just 16 passengers to every naturalist guide, you’ll have their full attention during the trip.

Back on board, you’ll have plenty of time to relax and enjoy a delicious dinner prepared by the onboard chef. Have a glass of wine, swap stories with your fellow guests, look up at the stars (both hemispheres are clearly visible), listen to a briefing of tomorrows itinerary, and get a good night’s sleep, ready for tomorrow’s experience.

To start planning your cruise in the Galapagos, take a look through our Galapagos tour suggestions, call our Galapagos experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478, or email us here.

RELATED: Take a journey around the Galapagos islands on this map

Free things to do in Buenos Aires

It’s not called the ‘Paris of Latin America’ for nothing. This beautiful city is the historical, cultural, and artistic hub of Argentina, with entertainment that rivals London, and restaurants to rival New York. It was in this truly great city that Argentina gained its independence from Spain, Eva Peron made her famous speech to over a million of her beloved descamisdos, and writers like Jorge Luís Borges wrote their famous literature. Many travellers don’t know this, but there is much to do in the city for free. Here’s a rundown of our favourite things to do that won’t cost you a penny.

Amble around the Botanical Gardens

Nestled in the beautiful Palermo neighbourhood, the Jardín Botánico was created by the famous French landscaper Carlos Thays in the 19th century. Buenos Aires is so proud of their botanical gardens that they declared them a national monument in 1996. Almost 7 hectares of beautiful manicured gardens teem with more than 5,000 species of plants, trees, and flowers, not to mention the variety of wildlife, most notably the birds and a large population of cats. Dotted around the gardens are numerous sculptures, fountains, and give beautiful greenhouses. On a sunny day, it’s a glorious place to amble through, or take a picnic and set up on the grass. Entrance is free.

Grab a free tango lesson

Nothing symbolises the nation of Argentina quite like tango. This famous dance has its origins from the late 19th century and in 2009 was added to the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage list. Visit a dinner and tango show can be relatively expensive, as can learning the dance in private lessons. Fear not. The streets and parks almost always have impromptu tango dances going on, with locals and tourists swinging each other around. If you head to La Glorieta in Belgrano at the weekend, there is always a tango dance in the evening, and if you arrive early you can bag yourself free lessons. It’s fun whether you’re an expert tango dancer or complete beginner.

Wander through San Telmo market

Flickr: LWYang

If you visit Buenos Aires on a Sunday, be sure to visit the famous flea market of San Telmo between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. This open-air arts and antiques market congregates around the Plaza Dorrego and was where many of the European and North American antique dealers came in the 80s to buy up cheap silver. Though it is, obviously, not free to buy things (and you must certainly will want too), just wandering through the market watching the local buyers and sellers haggling and socializing is a wonderful way to while away a few hours. Like anywhere in the world, where there is a market, there is always good food and San Telmo is no exception.

Hike through the Buenos Aires Ecological Reserve

One of the city’s best hidden secrets to tourists is the Reserva Ecologica Costanera Sur, an 865-acre wetland park located on the banks of the Rio de la Plata. While tourists rarely visit, locals use the park’s 20 kilometres of trails to jog, walk, or bicycle. During the summer months locals can be seen cooling off in the river or enjoy picnics with the family on the river’s grassy banks. Bird watchers will be delighted with the sheer numbers of wetland species to spot. If you visit between November and February when the weather in Buenos Aires is dry and the skies bright, clear a day in your itinerary to come down to the reserve, you won’t regret it.

See a show at the Teatro Colon for free

The Teatro Colon is the premier opera house in Argentina and is continually voted as one of the best in the world, both in terms of shows and the acoustics. The current theatre was built in the mid 19th century and stands as one of the finest pieces of architecture in Buenos Aires. Tickets are unsurprisingly expensive and shows sell out weeks in advance. However, locals and tourists can often get tickets for dress rehearsals. If you’d like to try your luck, be sure to get to the box office early in the morning. Dress rehearsal shows are usually on a Sunday.

See the resting place of Eva Peron

In the upmarket district of Recoleta, the cemetery is a popular spot for tourists who come to see the resting place of one of Argentina’s most important 20th century figures. Loved by the nation, Eva Peron (often called Evita) was the wife of the president, but sadly died of cancer at the young age of 33. Many still flock to her resting place to pay their respects. It’s not the only interesting thing here. The cemetery is full of art deco and art nouveau mausoleums that are fascinating. It’s free to enter, and there are guided tours in English on Tuesday and Thursday mornings. The cemetery is open between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. throughout the year.

To start planning your trip to Buenos Aires, take a look at our Argentine tour suggestions, call one of our travel experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478, or email us here.

RELATED: Top 5 holidays in Argentina

make-an-enquiry

create-your-journey