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5 PLACES TO GET WINTER SUN IN LATIN AMERICA

The nights are long, cold grey skies loom and the scarves and hats are been pulled out. Winter is here. But the cold weather in the northern hemisphere, means warmth in the south. It’s summer in Latin America and one of the best times to discover the continent’s mountains, beaches, culture and food. Here’s our 7 picks for the best spots to get some winter sun in Latin America

BAHIA, BRAZIL

The northern state of Bahia in Brazil is blessed with some of the best weather in Latin America. Year-round temperatures between 25°C and 30°C and over 250 hours of sunshine every month create the perfect winter getaway. But it’s not just the weather that makes this region such a great place to travel. Wild national parks, hundreds of miles of white sandy beaches fringed with palms trees, sleepy fishing villages, beautiful pastel-coloured colony architecture and UNESCO World Heritage sites and tasty cuisine that perfectly blends the Afro-Brazilian culture. Try visiting Salvador, the capital of Bahia, in February for a unique alternative to Rio de Janeiro’s Carnival. Flying time 12 hrs via Lisbon.

CARTAGENA, COLOMBIA

The colourful city of Cartagena lies on the northern coast of Colombia overlooking the clear blue waters of the Caribbean Sea. Between December and March, the city sees almost no rain and bright sunny days. There’s a wealth of boutique hotels. Many are within old colonial palaces. The city has its fair share of museums, galleries, music venues and restaurants to keep your entertained. For those who prefer to spend their holidays away from cities, there are miles and miles of coastline. Off the beaten track is the Tayrona National Park. Hikers can head inland to walk the challenging trails to the Lost City. The sun-drenched islands of Baru and Rosario are only a short boat trip from the city.

JOSÉ IGNACIO, URUGUAY

Bahia Vik, Jose Ignacio (copyright David Horwell)

Uruguay doesn’t spring to mind for your typical summer holiday. Yet the country is less crowded and has better beaches than neighbouring Argentina. On the coast lies the small fishing village of Jose Ignacio. The town grew around a 19th century lighthouse. Now favoured by jet-setters, the area has become an escape for the super-rich and celebrities. Ultra-modern hotels abound. During the summer months the area booms with pop up bars, concerts and parties. Spend lazy days sunbathing on the beach and swimming in the refreshing Atlantic. At night dine in one of the restaurants or beach-shack bars. Further down the coast there are some even less developed spots. At Cabo Polonio isolated wooden cabins fringe the edge of deserted beaches, the only sound being the crashing of waves.

TULUM, MEXICO

Cliffside Mayan Ruins at Tulum ca. 2002 Tulum, Mexico

Tulum lies along the Riviera Maya on Mexico’s Yucatan Peninsula south of Cancun. Comfortable temperatures hover around 28°C and enjoy a light sea breeze during December to February. An excellent choice for a winter getaway. The area is best known for its Mayan temple overlooking the ocean. This idyllic region has vast stretches of white sandy ocean and boutique accommodation. Snorkellers and scuba divers can enjoy exotic marine life. Nearby waters offer swimming with whale sharks, the big gentle giants.

BOCAS DEL TORO, PANAMA

Copyright David Horwell

Bocas del Toro is an archipelago of lush islands. They lie off the northern coast of Panama, near Costa Rica. Winter is the sunniest time. The islands have a distinct laid-back Caribbean vibe. Secluded wooden over-the-water bungalows sit off the coast from the tiny islands. The islands are excellent for hiking and bird-watching. The turquoise waters are great for diving, snorkelling, kayaking, surfing and swimming. Dolphins often jump above the sea and huge shoals of exotic fish inhabit the underwater world. Chill-out on a hammock, relax on one of the deserted beaches and gorge on fresh lobsters.

6 THINGS TO DO IN URUGUAY

ENJOY MONTEVIDEO THE STRESS-FREE CITY

The nation’s capital is big enough to have plenty to see, but small enough to get around easily. Much of the city is along the seafront, where locals jog and families play ball games. The city is ranked as having the highest quality of life in Latin America and considering many offices don’t start until 10am it has a very relaxed ambience. I visited earlier this year and found the people friendly and happy. The Spanish historic centre is like walking back in time, and for those who like meat stop at the Mercado del Puerto for an asado, a mixed charcoal grill. For shopping an old prison at Punta Carretas is now a fashionable mall. Tango is also as popular here as in Buenos Aires. If you want some real peace and quiet go to La Baguela, a country hotel just 30 minutes away with its own deserted beach.

RIDE THE DUNES OF ROCHA

The department of Rocha in the East has some of the finest beaches and lagoons in the country. The sand dunes are sparsely inhabited, and you can even stay in a yurt or beach cabin at La Pedrera. This quiet area is great for bird-watching, horse-riding or as I chose, biking. There are amazing walks over the dunes to the old hippie colony of Cabo Polonia. Take plenty of water with you on any of these trips, as there are no refreshments on sale anywhere. You may stumble upon tiny fisherman’s villages, but the only living thing I came across was a donkey.

PLAY JAMES BOND AT JOSÉ IGNACIO

José Ignacio is a coastal point that attracts the wealthy jet-set. You can find ultra-modern architects dream hotels like the three glamourous Vik properties (Estancia, Bahia and Playa) each decorated with unique works of art or the Fasano hotel in nearby Punta del Este. The Awa boutique hotel also is in Punta del Este. The lagoon at Jose Ignacio is a fave spot for kite-boarders.

TASTE THE TANNAT

Uruguay has some great wines, with a heritage going back to Italian, Spanish and French immigrants. The grape that has been adopted here is Tannat, which produces a heady, strong and full-bodied wine suited to the harsh dry environment. It is only recently been discovered by importers and well worth trying with a good steak. Some of the bodegas or wineries are open to visitors and do tastings, (make sure that you are not the designated driver). A few of the estancias take in guests, I particularly liked Narbona, which was further to the west near Carmelo. We also stopped at the charming Aguaverde Wine Lodge near Punta del Este for lunch. The welcoming lodge has rooms and cottages for guests, a stunning infinity pool and a vineyard beyond the gardens.

WALK AROUND COLONIA DEL SACRAMENTO

Take a day trip to Colonia, a charming town steeped in Spanish and Portuguese historical monuments. Popular with trippers from Argentina too, as a 45-minute ferry connects with Buenos Aires. The town is dominated by the lighthouse and fortified walls, but there are many interesting museums, churches and art galleries. One of the main attractions for me are the old classic cars that can be seen dotted around the centre, some of which are no longer driven but make unique bar-rooms for a romantic drink. There are some nice boutique hotels such as El Charco, if you have time enough to linger a day or two.

WHALE WATCHING

Southern Right Whales head along the coastlines of South America. They mate and raise their calves before migrating towards Antarctica, where their main feeding grounds are. Uruguay has some prime spots for whale watching. The season stretches from June to December, depending on the weather. The best time to observe these graceful giants and their offspring is between August and October. The Atlantic coast has good vantage points at Rocha and Punta del Este. Boat tours should be approved by the Organization for the Conservation of Whales (OCC-Uruguay) to make sure that the whales are not disturbed. It is even possible to observe them from the beach, with a binoculars. Watch out for water sprays, churning water and flocks of sea gulls – these are sure indicators that whales are near. Chances are even better in the early morning or late afternoon. For more details about visiting Uruguay do contact us.
All pictures except whale are copyright David Horwell.

RELATED: 6 Things to do in Uruguay

REACH FOR THE STARS IN CHILE

Chile is probably the best place in the World for star-gazing. Whether you are a casual star-gazer, or a professional astronomer, Chile is hard to beat. Astronomy is gaining popularity as more people are interested in the wonders of the sky and the mysteries of the universe. Much of this long country are sparsely populated which reduces light pollution. The dry desert climate in the north creates some of the clearest nights in the world and its location provides an ideal view of the southern sky. In the 1960’s, ESO (European Southern Observatory) built its Observatory La Silla in the outskirts of the famous Atacama Desert. In 2019, La Silla will celebrate 50 years of operation. 2019 will also be the year of a total eclipse in Northern Chile on July 02nd 2019. The Moon will cover the Sun completely in the late afternoon and turn the day into night. La Silla is organizing a ‘2019 Total Solar Eclipse Event’. Tickets sold out immediately. Accommodation almost anywhere in the zone of the eclipse also sold out a while ago. All is not lost however, we can offer a Glamping Experience for a 4-day/ 3-night trip from La Serena to the Elqui Valley (1-4 July). You will stay in the heart of the desert and be able to sip cocktails around a bonfire. A trip will be made to a unique observation point. Visit villages and sample the local cuisine and Pisco beverage. Other activities include sightseeing and bathing in thermal springs.

Even if you are not an astronomy enthusiast, the breath-taking view of the star-filled sky is always worth a visit. Tip: If you are heading to the Atacama, avoid the full-moon, so stars will be more visible. Contact us for more information and star-gazing programs in Chile.

RELATED: 8 Amazing Journeys You Should Take In Chile

What is sandboarding?

Sand-boarding is becoming the next big thing. Like snow-boarding, but you’ll be carving down sand dunes instead of snowy mountains. You’ll be first hiking up the dunes, or climbing in a buggy instead of taking a ski lift. It’s no less exhilarating and you don’t have to wait until the right season to have a go.

Ancient Egyptians first sled down the desert sand dunes on wooden boards more than 2,000 years ago. More recently, around 800 A.D., the Chinese.  In modern times, sand-boarding picked-up in the late 1960s. Now gaining popularity in Australia, Japan, Peru and parts of Europe. For years, travellers have been descending on the sandy dunes of Ica and Nazca in Peru. The highest is Cerro Blanco (or White Hill) which stretches a staggering 2,000 metres.

There are some stark differences in the equipment used. Sandboards are much harder than snowboards, more durable and made from a Formica base, with a hard ply-wood top. Some come with bindings to strap your feet into, others come without. These are particularly useful if you’re in the learning stages and will likely fall. Aficionados apply a wax to the base to help gliding. On deep sand, you may be able to use a normal snowboard, through it’s usually easier to rent a board when you arrive.

To see sand-boarding at its best, visit the Copa Sandboarding Cup near Paracas every year. Alternatively, the Pan-American Sandboarding Challenge near Prainha Beach in Brazil every July.

Want to try sandboarding yourself? Call one of our travel experts on +44 (0) 407 1478 to start planning your sandboarding adventure or email us here.

RELATED: Biking the mountains of Peru [VID]

8 treks in Argentina you simply cannot miss

Argentina ranges from tropics to frozen steppes. It’s a mecca for outdoorsy types who descend each summer to hike along spectacular trails, from towering snow-capped granite peaks of Patagonia to the dry deserts in the north. With such a choice, it’s hard to know where to start. Here’s our handy guide to the 8 best treks in the country.

Mount Fitz Roy

Flickr: Chris Ford

Mount Fitz Roy is Argentina’s answer to the Torres del Paine National Park. If you’re going to do just one trek, make it one of the trails which departs from El Chalten and winds around the Los Glaciers National Park. There’s something for all abilities here, with trips ranging from easy half-day hikes to challenging five-day camping adventures. There are few places in the world where you can walk in such awe-inspiring scenery. Think large granite peaks punctuated by turquoise mountain lakes and pristine glaciers.

Huemul Circuit

This one’s a toughie. The 45-mile takes at least 4 days and you’ll need to bring your own GPS and camping equipment, as well as harnesses to get across several river crossings. It’s well worth the effort though to see the Southern Patagonian Ice Fields. If you’re looking for a relaxed trek, this isn’t for you. If you want to push yourself and experience some of the most spectacular scenery in Latin America, lace up your boots.

Paso de las Nubes

Flickr: Sean Munson

Literally translating to ‘Path Through the Clouds’, this spectacular trek traverses a 14-mile route from the town of Pampa Linda through the forests and over Mount Tranador on the border with Chile. It’s a challenging trek which takes two days, so you’ll need to overnight in a refugio or bring camping equipment with you. One the second day, you’ll descend to the beautiful Laguna Frias where you can take a return boat journey.

Iguazu Falls

Flickr: seretide

There’s a reason why Iguazu Falls is part of Argentina’s well-trodden tourist path. The falls are truly awe-inspiring and there’s no better way to experience them than walking along the wooden boardwalks, getting so close you can feel the spray on your face. The upper and lower circuits are distinctly different, so try to do both if you have the time and be sure to visit the Devil’s Throat which brings you nearest to this natural wonder.

Refugio Frey Hike

Flickr: McKay Savage

The Frey Hike is popular all summer due to the ski gondolas which takes hikers to the top of the mountain. Departing from here, you can either take a tough but shorter route clambering over boulders, or a longer but easier walk through forests. Along the way, you can overnight at the Refugio Frey which has comfortable beds and facilities or pitch your own tent. For reasons unknown, this trek is not as popular as the others, but those who take it on enjoy gorgeous scenery and uncrowded trails.

Perito Moreno Glacier

Flickr: Alex Berger

Short but sweet, to complete the Perito Moreno Glacier trek you’ll need to don crampons and cross over the lake by boat. From here, your guide will take you over the top of one of Latin America’s most beautiful glaciers. The trek lasts around an hour or two and at the end, you can enjoy a well-deserved glass of whisky served with ice carved off the glacier.

El Bolsón

While most travellers stick to Bariloche, those in the know head to the charming little town of El Bolsón. Here, you’ll find 13 mountain refuges dotting the wild landscape and linking a series of paths that work their way across valleys, around lakes and through lush forests. You can choose from a short one-nighter or a long hike that could last more than a week. With challenging hikes to shorter walks, everyone can enjoy the hiking around El Bolsón.

Quebrada de Humahuaca

The desert northern region of Argentina is home to some of the country’s most colourful natural wonders. Be sure to visit The Hill of Seven Colours just a short distance from Purmamarca. There are plenty of hikes through the Quebrada de Humahuaca, best with the help of a local guide. The scenery, friendly locals and year-round good weather in Northern Argentina make it one of the most popular places to hike.

Want to hike through Argentina? Speak to one of our experts at +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or email us here to start planning your journey today.

RELATED: Top 5 holidays in Argentina

Free things to do in Buenos Aires

It’s not called the ‘Paris of Latin America’ for nothing. This beautiful city is the historical, cultural, and artistic hub of Argentina, with entertainment that rivals London, and restaurants to rival New York. It was in this truly great city that Argentina gained its independence from Spain, Eva Peron made her famous speech to over a million of her beloved descamisdos, and writers like Jorge Luís Borges wrote their famous literature. Many travellers don’t know this, but there is much to do in the city for free. Here’s a rundown of our favourite things to do that won’t cost you a penny.

Amble around the Botanical Gardens

Nestled in the beautiful Palermo neighbourhood, the Jardín Botánico was created by the famous French landscaper Carlos Thays in the 19th century. Buenos Aires is so proud of their botanical gardens that they declared them a national monument in 1996. Almost 7 hectares of beautiful manicured gardens teem with more than 5,000 species of plants, trees, and flowers, not to mention the variety of wildlife, most notably the birds and a large population of cats. Dotted around the gardens are numerous sculptures, fountains, and give beautiful greenhouses. On a sunny day, it’s a glorious place to amble through, or take a picnic and set up on the grass. Entrance is free.

Grab a free tango lesson

Nothing symbolises the nation of Argentina quite like tango. This famous dance has its origins from the late 19th century and in 2009 was added to the UNESCO Intangible Cultural Heritage list. Visit a dinner and tango show can be relatively expensive, as can learning the dance in private lessons. Fear not. The streets and parks almost always have impromptu tango dances going on, with locals and tourists swinging each other around. If you head to La Glorieta in Belgrano at the weekend, there is always a tango dance in the evening, and if you arrive early you can bag yourself free lessons. It’s fun whether you’re an expert tango dancer or complete beginner.

Wander through San Telmo market

Flickr: LWYang

If you visit Buenos Aires on a Sunday, be sure to visit the famous flea market of San Telmo between 10 a.m. and 5 p.m. This open-air arts and antiques market congregates around the Plaza Dorrego and was where many of the European and North American antique dealers came in the 80s to buy up cheap silver. Though it is, obviously, not free to buy things (and you must certainly will want too), just wandering through the market watching the local buyers and sellers haggling and socializing is a wonderful way to while away a few hours. Like anywhere in the world, where there is a market, there is always good food and San Telmo is no exception.

Hike through the Buenos Aires Ecological Reserve

One of the city’s best hidden secrets to tourists is the Reserva Ecologica Costanera Sur, an 865-acre wetland park located on the banks of the Rio de la Plata. While tourists rarely visit, locals use the park’s 20 kilometres of trails to jog, walk, or bicycle. During the summer months locals can be seen cooling off in the river or enjoy picnics with the family on the river’s grassy banks. Bird watchers will be delighted with the sheer numbers of wetland species to spot. If you visit between November and February when the weather in Buenos Aires is dry and the skies bright, clear a day in your itinerary to come down to the reserve, you won’t regret it.

See a show at the Teatro Colon for free

The Teatro Colon is the premier opera house in Argentina and is continually voted as one of the best in the world, both in terms of shows and the acoustics. The current theatre was built in the mid 19th century and stands as one of the finest pieces of architecture in Buenos Aires. Tickets are unsurprisingly expensive and shows sell out weeks in advance. However, locals and tourists can often get tickets for dress rehearsals. If you’d like to try your luck, be sure to get to the box office early in the morning. Dress rehearsal shows are usually on a Sunday.

See the resting place of Eva Peron

In the upmarket district of Recoleta, the cemetery is a popular spot for tourists who come to see the resting place of one of Argentina’s most important 20th century figures. Loved by the nation, Eva Peron (often called Evita) was the wife of the president, but sadly died of cancer at the young age of 33. Many still flock to her resting place to pay their respects. It’s not the only interesting thing here. The cemetery is full of art deco and art nouveau mausoleums that are fascinating. It’s free to enter, and there are guided tours in English on Tuesday and Thursday mornings. The cemetery is open between 7 a.m. and 6 p.m. throughout the year.

To start planning your trip to Buenos Aires, take a look at our Argentine tour suggestions, call one of our travel experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478, or email us here.

RELATED: Top 5 holidays in Argentina

TROPICANA BIRD PARK IGUAÇU

Toucan in the Bird Park

Brazil’s Iguaçu Falls National Park is full of exotic wildlife. Exploring the tropical waterfalls is a real ‘bucket-list’ experience, but there’s much more to discover. Often overlooked, is the Parque das Aves or ‘Bird Park’, an ornithological sanctuary. Here rescued birds are find a home. This attraction is a bonus for any wildlife enthusiast. Our private excursion will take a behind the scenes look at the park. You will spend time in the company of chattering songbirds, start at either 7.30am, 10.30am or 2pm. Though we recommend the early morning slot for keen twitchers.

You will have the chance to see staff at work, watch feeding and see rare species up close. Learn how passionate park rangers care for these beautiful, vulnerable creatures. Parque das Aves is also home to a blissful butterfly garden, and a resident boa constrictor. Round the visit off by enjoying some light refreshments and fresh fruit from the region. A delicious, sweet end to this insightful birding experience. This can be booked as part of any tour of the region.

RELATED: Braving the spray of Iguazú Falls

UNUSUAL URUGUAY FOR CHRISTMAS?

Punta del Este

Even during summer, it is never too early to plan for the winter hols. With Christmas and New Year 6 months away, it is a good time to secure flights and hotels. Consider Uruguay. It´s about time this little gem nestled between Argentina and Brazil came into the spotlight. A small country but has around 660 km. coastline along the River Plate, the world´s biggest estuary. In the bustling capital Montevideo, enjoy strolling through the lovely old town and dining in fine restaurants. A few hours away, lies Uruguay´s oldest city, Colonia del Sacramento. Founded in 1680, it feels like stepping back in time. The city has a charming colonial ambiance, and old classic cars abound like in Havana. Jose Ignacio, a small coastal town, is an international jet-setter destination and Punta del Este is the must-see for beach lovers. Further north the coast becomes wilder and ideal for nature lovers.

The classy Hyatt hotel Carmelo Resort & Spa, on the banks of Rio de la Plata. It has holiday packages with activities: yoga lessons, Spa, bikes, tennis courts and daily activities at the kid´s club. The packages are subject to a minimum of 3 (Christmas) or 4 (New Year) consecutive nights. More information and rates on request. Contact us for travel ideas and itineraries.

RELATED: 6 Things to do in Uruguay

Whale watching in Costa Rica starts in July

Now is the time to head down to warm waters of the Golfo Dulce in southern Costa Rica. Pacific humpback whales arrive on their annual migration to mate and socialize. After spending the southern summer in Antarctica, they head to the tropics the breed. They stay until October. You will get up-close to giant sentient beings that share the planet with us. These southern whales hang-out in the protected waters of the Golfo Dulce and the Ballena National Marine Park. Here they enjoy shallow coastal waters and protection from natural predators like sharks and Orcas. National Geographic rated Costa Rica the 7th best place in the world for whale watching. Watch their tail-slapping displays, breaches above the water and spot their distinctive humps.

“I remember vividly the first time I saw a humpback whale in the wild. Suddenly, a spray of water erupted from the calm blue-green water a few hundred yards off the beach. The long, black and barnacled form of a mother humpback whale surfaced gracefully for air. Our little group pointed excitedly at the huge whale. Then we gasped in delight as we caught sight of the smaller shape of her baby swimming by her side.
We jumped into a boat, and at a respectful distance, we cruised along with mother and baby as they slowly swam along the dark green coast thick with rainforest. Pairs of Scarlet Macaws flew overhead as sunset neared, heading to roost in tall shoreline trees for the night. The whales disappeared out of sight, and we motored back enchanted.” Shannon Farley.

If seeing whales and dolphins up close in their natural environment is on your bucket list, you can go on Costa Rica whale-watching tours from Playa Nicuesa Rainforest Lodge starting toward the end of July through the end of September. Keep a look-out also for visiting whale sharks, the largest fish in the sea. Nicuesa Lodge is giving a special offer of one free night when you stay a minimum of three or more nights. Contact us for more details.

RELATED: 12 amazing things to do in Costa Rica

The 20 Best Hikes In Latin America

There are so many amazing hikes you can do through the Americas ranging from light days hikes to serious mountaineering climbs to summits. We’ll start with the Inca Trail, the most famous of the lot, but by no means the best. Please note that although some of the treks below are possible by yourself, most require a guide.

Flickr: Lisa Weichel

Flickr: Lisa Weichel

Inca Trail – Peru

The Inca Trail to Machu Picchu is perhaps the most iconic on this list of treks in Latin America. Most Inca Trail trips last four days. After heading out of the Inca capital of Cuzco you will hike through the lush Sacred Valley, walking in the footsteps of the ancient Incas. Along the way pass remnants of Incas including Ollantaytambo before finally arriving at Machu Picchu, one of the Seven Wonders of the World. It is such a popular trek the government limit the number of trekkers to 500 per day which requires a permit that sell out months in advance. Guides will accompany you to help you make the most of the hike and porters will carry your things as well as setting up camp and cooking your meals to make the trek as comfortable as possible.

When to go: All year round expect February when the trail is closed.
Difficulty: 3/5
Length: 4 days
Tour: Get in touch for a bespoke tour

Lake Atitlan

Lake Atitlan – Guatemala

The three day trek from Xela to Lake Atitlan is also extremely popular. Along the way pass the verdant interior of Guatemala passing through cloud forests, small indigenous communities, volcanoes and of course, Lake Atitlan, once described by Aldous Huxley as the most beautiful lake in the world. Day one begins with a three hour hike to a view point overlooking the many surrounding volcanoes including Atitlan, Acatenango, Santa Maria and more. Day two descend down into the verdant valleys of pine trees and farms. Day three arrival at Lake Atitlan and hike around the edge.

When to go: All year round
Difficulty: 2/5
Length: 3 days
Tour: Try our Dynamic Guatemala tour

Flickr: Frank Vassen

Flickr: Frank Vassen

The Quetzal Trail – Panama

Although this is a relatively easy hike, it is considered by many one of the most scenic. Located in the Western highlands of Panama within the Volcan Baru National Park, most people hike the trail for the chance to spot the resplendent quetzal, the bird that gives the trail its name, and one of the most colourful in Latin America. The treks departs from Boquete, the town where most tourists stay when visiting the region and takes around five hours to complete.

When to go: All year round
Difficulty: 1/5
Length: 1 day
Tour: Try our Canals, Clouds & Coconuts tour

Flickr: Andrew Hyde

Flickr: Andrew Hyde

Lost City Trek – Colombia

Surprisingly relatively few people hike the trail that ends at the Lost City in Colombia, an ancient citadel likened to Machu Picchu , so if you are looking for undiscovered gems, this is the best you are going to get. The Lost City was only discovered in 1976 by archaeologists from the Colombian Institute of Anthropology. Research since suggests it was founded around 600 A.D. and abandoned around one thousand years later. The four day trek departs from Santa Marta and passes lush jungle to arrive at the citadel.

When to go: All year round
Difficulty: 2/5
Length: 4 days
Tour: Get in touch for a bespoke tour

Torres del Paine

The W Trek – Chile

The W Trek traverses the Torres del Paine National Park in Patagonian region of Southern Chile. This five day trek will take you past some of the most stark and dramatic scenery on the continent. Towering snow-capped peaks, mighty glaciers, clear tortoise lakes are a daily occurrence on this relatively challenging hike. You may think this barren landscape lacks wildlife, but flamingos, hares and guanacos and more inhabit the area as well as the Andean condors that gracefully glide above. The trek can either be done camping or staying in the basic but comfortable refugees along the way. If five days is too much shorter day hikes can be arranged.

When to go: October to April
Difficulty: 4/5
Length: 5 days
Tour: Try our W Trek Tour

Arenal

Arenal National Park – Costa Rica

The dominant Arenal Volcano that towers above the National Park is simply spectacular. There are a number of different guided trails to hike, each of them relatively gentle making it a good option for kids. Each passes the lower foothills of the volcano passing rainforest and lava fields and enjoying views of the volcano above. Los Helicanias trails leads to a particularly good lookout point over Lake Arenal. Afterwards head to one of the local hot springs for a well-earned soak. Tabacon Grand Spa a highly recommended.

When to go: All year round
Difficulty: 1/5
Length: 1 day
Tour: Try our Jungles, Volcanoes & Beaches tour

Flickr: McKay Savage

Flickr: McKay Savage

Paso del las Nubes – Argentina
An excellent two day hike in Argentina’s Lake District. After getting picked up from Bariloche, begin from the foot of Mount Tronador, also known as Pampa Linda. Hike through verdant forests and streams to a pass that offers excellent views over glaciers, waterfalls and Pampa Linda. Ascend to “Paso de las Nubes” (literally pass of the clouds) and camp for the night. The following day trek along the edge of Frias River to Puerto Frias and catch the last ferry returning back to the city. The trek can be extended into Chile if you wish for something longer or more challenging. There is much wildlife to see along the way including

When to go:
September to April
Difficulty: 3/5
Length: 2 days
Tour: Get in touch for a bespoke tour


Copper Canyon – Mexico

Copper Canyon in Mexico’s north is most famous for its railway, but the scenery and trails also make for some fantastic trekking. Surprisingly to most it is deeper, wider and longer than the Grand Canyon. Although the length of tours range, most guided tours are around ten days. Along the way you will pass small Tarahumara villages and enjoy plenty of wildlife.

When to go: All year round
Difficulty: 3/5
Length: 8+ days
Tour: Get in touch for a bespoke tour


Corcovado National Park – Costa Rica

The Corcovado National Park in Costa’s Rica’s Southern Osa Peninsula is, as National Geographic called it, one of the most biologically intense places on earth. There are plenty of trails here passing rainforests and beaches, many of which can be done by yourself. The really attraction of hikes here is the abundance of wildlife. Howler monkeys, squirrel monkeys, spider monkeys, capuchins, crocodiles, jaguars, pumas, ocelots, tapirs, anteaters, sloths, tamanduas, toucans, macaws, eagles and many species of reptile to name just a few. If snorkeling is your thing, stop along the way and find a huge array of marine life such as tropical fish, turtles and dolphins. There are plenty of luxury lodges so a trip here can be done in serious comfort should you wish.

When to go: All year round
Difficulty: 2/5
Length: 3+ days
Tour: Try our Romance in Costa Rica tour 

Huchuy Qosqo Trek – Peru

This is an excellent option for those that don’t want to hike the ever popular Inca Trail. It isn’t challenging, but takes you through some sublime Andean countryside to the little known (or visited) Huchuy Qosqo Inca site. This archaeological site north of Cuzco lies at 3,600 metres above sea level and is called ‘Little Cuzco’. Although it can be seen in one day, it is best combined with a visit to Machu Picchu in a three day adventure. Begin in Tambomachay and ahike through valleys, lakes and passes to the village of Qenko where you will spend the first night. Along the way birds including lapwings and Andean geese can be seen. The following day you will follow the route to Huchuy Qosqo and have plenty of time to explore. Trek down into the Sacred Valley and take the bus to Ollantaytambo and the train to Aguas Calientes. One the last day you will visit Machu Picchu before returning back to Cuenca.

When to go: All year round
Difficulty: 3/5
Length:1-3 days
Tour: Get in touch for a bespoke tour

Ausangate Circuit – Peru

Another excellent alternative to the Inca Trail offering some of the best views of any Cuzco treks. South of the city in the Vilcanota mountain range, this is a challenging hike for those who have some experience with fairly high altitude walking. Along the way you will cross three passes over 5,500 metres. This wild trek is named after the Apu Ausandate that towers at almost 6,500 metres. Culturally it is also interesting: you will visit traditional villages and local Quechua farmers. It can easily be combined with a visit to Machu Picchu.

When to go: May to October
Difficulty: 4/5
Length: 5 days
Tour: Get in touch for a bespoke tour

Colca

Colca Canyon – Peru

Although most visit Colca Canyon viewpoint in Peru’s Arequipa district to see the majestic Andean Condor’s flying overhead, there are some excellent and little hiked trails to explore. You will require a guide here as none of the trails are marked (although they have been used for hundreds of years). An execellent three day option begins in Cabanaconde and passes San Juan de Chuccho, Coshnirhua, Malata and ends at the Cruz del Condor viewpoint.

When to go: All year round
Difficulty: 3/5
Length: 1-3 days
Tour: Get in touch for a bespoke tour

Huayna Potosi – Bolivia

This is the toughest trek on our list and the only one to reach a summit. Having said that, this is possible for inexperience climbers who have had plenty of time to acclimatize and a little determination. The three day climb that includes a day of acclimatization takes you over 6,000 metres with up to eight hours hiking a day. This is one of the easiest 6,000 mountain climbs, but that is not to say it is easy. Although it can be done in two days, it is not recommended. Departed in the early hours on the day of the ascent you will climb ice walls, cross crevasses and enjoy views down over La Paz and the surrounding mountains.

When to go: All year round
Difficulty: 5/5
Length: 3 days
Tour: Get in touch for a bespoke tour

Fitzroy

Fitzroy Trek – Argentina

The Fitzroy Trek in Argentin’a Los Glaciers National Park is the countries equivalent to Torres del Paine in Chile. There are a huge number of hiking options here varying from day walks to longer give day trails. The advantage of Fitzroy over Torres del Paine is being able to visit some of the best viewpoints on the shorter treks. Arguably the best views in the park are at where the three peaks – Cerro Fitzroy, Cerro Poincenot and Cerro Torre meet over Laguna de los Tres.

When to go: October to April
Difficulty: 4/5
Length: 1-5 days
Tour: Try our Patagonia Ice Trail tour 

Chapada Diamantina – Brazil

Most visit the northern Bahia region of Brazil for the beaches and city of Salvador. Whilst those are certainly worth a visit, the interior has some of the finest trekking in Brazil. To reach Chapada Diamnatina National Park you must first take a short flight or bus ride to the old mining town of Lençóis. The trails pass some remote and dramatic scenery of mountains, forests, valleys, canyons, waterfalls, caves and rivers with very few other visitors to distract you. Although much wildlife including giant anteaters and armadillos were wiped out by hunting, there is plenty to see including lizards, capybaras, monkeys and if you are really lucky, pumas and jaguars. Depending on your budget you can either camp or stay in some of the local guesthouses.

When to go: All year round
Difficulty: 3/5
Length: 3+ days
Tour: Get in touch for a bespoke tour

Terespolis Crossing – Brazil

This fantastic thirty five kilometre hiking route in Rio de Janeiro state from Petropolis to Teresopolis is a must for another hiking enthusiast. Walking at altitudes of around 2,000 metres through the Serra dos Orgaos National Park passing by Antas Valley and the sumnit of Orgaos. There is no lodging along the way so you will be camping. If the sky is clear you can see all the way down to Rio de Janeiro city and Guanabara Bay from some viewpoints.

When to go: All year round
Difficulty: 2/5
Length: 3 days
Tour: Get in touch for a bespoke tour

Monteverde – Costa Rica

The Monteverde cloud forest reserve is truly beautiful and can best experienced on guided day walks. The trails are clearly marked and easy to walk so they are ideal for kids or those with limited mobility. The reserve covers over 4,500 hectares of cloud forest where you will find tumbling waterfalls, lakes and plenty of wildlife. There are over a hundred species of mammal, four hundred species of birds and thousands of amphibians. Some of the highlights including ocelots, jaguars, umbrellabirds and the colourful resplendent quetzal. There is no need to camp as there is excellent and comfortable accommodation near by.

When to go: All year round
Difficulty: 1/5
Length: 1+ days
Tour: Try our Jungles, Volcanoes & Beaches tour

Flickr: vil.sandi

Flickr: vil.sandi

Salcantay Trek – Peru

The Salcantay Trek (Salkantay means Savage Mountain in Quechuan) is another alternative to the Inca Trail. Named as one of the best treks in the world by National Geographic, this is certainly not one to miss. As fewer people do the Inca Trail, there is no permit scheme for the Salkantay Trek making it perfect for a last minute booking. North of Cuzco lies the Cordillera Vilcabamba. Here you will trek the ancient trail past glaciers and snowcapped mountains. If you want to skip the crowds, this is the trek for you. It can also be combined with Machu Picchu so you don’t miss out on this Seventh Wonder of the World.

When to go: All year round
Difficulty: 3/5
Length: 3+ days
Tour: Get in touch for a bespoke tour

El Misti Trek – Peru

Located near the Southern city of Arequipa, El Misti Volcano rises up to almost 6,000 metres above sea level and is the second largest in the country. The volcano has erupted several times, the most notable was in the 15th century which affected many local Inca people. The latest was in the late 19th century. The climb can be done in as little as two days as long as you have given yourself plenty of time to acclimatize beforehand. For such a high trek it is relatively easy and no prior experience is necessary. One night is spent at the Eagles Nest base camp located at 4,200 metres.

When to go: April to October
Difficulty: 4/5
Length: 2 days
Tour: Get in touch for a bespoke tour

Quilotoa

Quilotoa Traverse – Ecuador

The volcanic crater lake Quilotoa located north of Quito near to the famous Andean market town of Otavalo is usually visiting on a day trip with some time for a short walk. Spend a little more time in this magical place as you can hike the whole rim in around five hours. A deeply satisfying and relatively easy walk. You will also have the opportunity to descend down from the viewing point to the lake which takes another hour or so. From the rim, not only can you see the lake below but you can also see Cotopaxi and mountain ranges in the distance.

When to go: All year round
Difficulty: 2/5
Length: 1 day
Tour: Try our Cotopaxi & Devil’s Nose tour 

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