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Tierra del Fuego – Take a Cruise Around the Horn

There’s not been a better time to visit the spectacular fjords of Tierra del Fuego than since the recent launch of the Ventus Australis ship. The 210-passenger vessel, whose name translates to “Southern Wind”, offers guests one of the more comfortable and luxurious ways to explore the southern tip of Latin America. Plus, her unique design has been custom built for the narrow waterways bringing guests to spots never thought possible before.

So, what does a cruise on board the Ventus Australis look like. Here’s our day by day itinerary beginning in Punta Arenas.

Day 1 – Punta Arenas

Today, you will check in on board in the afternoon and at 6pm the ship departs. As she cruises away from the port, you can enjoy an introduction about the upcoming experience from the captain and crew accompanied by a welcome drink. The rest of the evening is free to relax.

As you sleep in your comfortable cabin, the newly built ship will silently cross the Strait of Magellan and criss-cross the narrow passageways and channels towards the extreme south of Patagonian. You’ll pass between Darwin Island and Isla Grande de Tierra del Fuego, the Land of Fire.

Day 2 – Ainsworth Bay and Tuckers Islets

When you wake up in the morning, the shop will be cruising through the Admiralty Sound. After breakfast on board, you can head up to the top deck to catch a glimpse of the spectacular snow-capped peaks of the Karukinka Natural Park and the bays of the Alberto de Agostini National Park.

Your first stop is at Ainsworth Bay. Hop aboard zodiacs and make a dry landing to get up close to nesting sea birds and a noisy colony of southern elephant seals. Your guide will take you on a walk inland along the banks of a stream where you can see beavers before a more challenging hike up the crest of a glacial moraine. Along each walk, you can take in magnificent views of the Darwin Mountains and the Marinelli Glacier.

Set sail again and cruise through sounds towards Tucket Islets. After lunch on board, you’ll jump back on to zodiacs to get up close to more than 4,000 Magellan penguins. You’ll also spot oystercatchers, Chilean skuas, eagles, king cormorants and circling Andean condors. Return back to the Ventus Australis for a relaxed evening.

Day 3 – Pia Glacier and Glacier Alley

During the night, you would have cruised around western edge of Tierra del Fuego along the narrow Gabrial Channel. As you wake up, you’ll be sailing through the beautiful Pia Fjord. Accompany the views with breakfast before heading to shore on board zodiacs.

Your guide will take you on a hike which reveals views over a spectacular glacier which tumbles down a mountainside towards the sea. There’s also the opportunity for a longer trek up a lateral moraine on the Pia Glacier.

Return to the ship for a relaxed evening and enjoy several tidewater glaciers that flow down the Darwin Mountains and Darwin Ice Sheet, many of which have been named after European countries.

Day 4 – Cape Horn and Wulaia Bay

During the morning, you will cruise along Nassau Bay towards one of the most remote archipelagos in Patagonia and the Cape Horn National Park. If the weather permits, you will be heading ashore at the iconic Cape Horn. It was first discovered in the early 17th century and was declared to as the “End of the Earth”. Today, the site has been designated as a World Biosphere Reserve by UNESCO.

During the afternoon you’ll navigate along the Murray Channel and drop anchor at the historic Wulaia Bay. It was once the last settlement of the Yamana tribe and was detailed by Charles Darwin during his 1830’s voyage on the HMS Beagle. You’ll take a visit to the small museum housed in an old radio station which has exhibits on the human history. Be sure to leave a letter in the old mailing barrel.

Afterwards, there are several challenging hikes to choose from which will take you along a winding trail which passes enchanting Magellan forests and views over the bay. Return to the vessel for your last evening on board.

Day 5 – Ushuaia

After a comfortable night’s sleep, you’ll arrive back in Ushuaia, the world’s most southernly city and disembark after breakfast.

RELATED: Patagonia Argentina’s Wild Atlantic Coast

Ready to start planning your cruise in Tierra del Fuego? Call one of our experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or email us here.

SUMMER IN THE GALAPAGOS ISLANDS

Copyright David Horwell

Every month is a wildlife delight in the Galapagos Islands, and the northern summer months are no exception. The giant tortoises on Santa Cruz island have begun to migrate to the highlands in preparation for nesting season, blue-footed boobies are particularly active and, if you’re lucky, you may get to see the curious courtship ritual of the flightless cormorants. Whales and dolphins are more active, especially off the western islands. It is also a good time to spot migrant shorebirds. In central islands you can observe sea lions starting to give birth and rearing their young.

We offer 4-nights, 5-nights and longer combinations on board our stylish Galapagos yachts that are designed to showcase the very best of this wondrous archipelago. Contact us to book your trip.

RELATED: A typical day in the Galapagos Islands

A typical day in the Galapagos Islands

The Galapagos archipelago lies off the Ecuadorian mainland and is home to some of the most fascinating wildlife on the planet. It’s isolated location, lack of predators, a little contact with humans over thousands of years has helped the fearless wildlife flourish. Nowhere else on earth can you see some a range of species, from flightless cormorants, penguins, and giant tortoises that roam around on the highlands, while sharks, dolphins, and whales take refuge in the plankton rich waters. Without a doubt, the easiest way to see the island is on board one of the many cruise ships.  No day is the same, with new experiences and wildlife found on every island and site, but a typical day looks something like this.

In the morning, you will wake up to the sounds of sea birds and the gentle lapping of the ocean. Up on deck, you’ll likely to get you first sight of birds which circle around the boat above. Your crew will already have been up early creating a spread of eggs, toast, fresh fruits, yogurts, cereals, juice, and coffee for your breakfast.  You’ll have some time to eat and get ready before the excursion begins. During breakfast, your guide will give you a briefing of the day, what you’re likely to see, and what you’ll need to bring with you.

Board pangas (inflatable boats), to and cross over for either a wet or dry-landing. If wet, you’ll jump out into the water and wade through onto the beach. During a dry landing, the boat will moor up and allow you to step ashore. Which one depends on the site you are visiting. Once on shore, your naturalist guide will take you on a walk, perhaps up to a viewpoint. Along the way, you’ll likely to see everything from noisy sea lion colonies, blue-footed boobies doing their hilarious mating dance, great frigatebirds expanding their colourful red poach, iguanas basking in the sunshine, and waddling penguins. Your guide will help you identify the species, as well as the flora of the island. Back at the shore, you can don snorkel masks and fins and jump into the sea to explore the marine life of turtles, small reef sharks, and colourful schools of fish.

Having worked up an appetite, you’ll board pangas to ride back to the boat. The chef will have been busy preparing a delicious buffet style lunch which typically includes pastas, meat, cheese, bread, vegetables, and some dessert, along with fresh fruit and juices. You’ll have a little time to relax as the boat cruises on to the next destination.

You’ll motor to a new site which will reveal a whole host of new species to discover. For example on Santa Cruz island, you’ll head up the windy roads to the lush green highlands. With your ever present guide, you’ll hike through the greenery in search of some of the island’s giant Galapagos tortoises. They move slowly, so they’re never hard to find. Enjoy close encounters with alien-looking but gentle ambling creatures.

Return to the coast. If time permits, you’ll be taken to another site for some snorkelling. In the cool waters, perhaps spot large manta ray, a colourful parrot fish, a green turtle, or a playful sea lion pup whose inquisitiveness with bring them up close to you. The underwater life in the Galapagos is simply astounding, with rare coral reefs and fascinating marine creatures. You may even spot the odd harmless reef shark gracefully swimming. As always, your naturalist guide will be with you to help you spot and identify the flora and fauna species. With just 16 passengers to every naturalist guide, you’ll have their full attention during the trip.

Back on board, you’ll have plenty of time to relax and enjoy a delicious dinner prepared by the onboard chef. Have a glass of wine, swap stories with your fellow guests, look up at the stars (both hemispheres are clearly visible), listen to a briefing of tomorrows itinerary, and get a good night’s sleep, ready for tomorrow’s experience.

To start planning your cruise in the Galapagos, take a look through our Galapagos tour suggestions, call our Galapagos experts on +44 (0) 207 407 1478, or email us here.

RELATED: Take a journey around the Galapagos islands on this map

Antarctic cruise special offers

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The Antarctic is a truly amazing place, a wilderness of pristine icebergs, glistening waterways, waddling penguins, and fluking whales. The season runs between November and March and with places limited, if you plan to go, it’s best to secure your place early with a deposit. If you’re still not quite sure, here’s several early bird special offers to help you make your decision.

Cruise Date Days Special Offer
Falklands & South Georgia 20/10 – 7/11 19 $1,000 off
South Georgia In Depth 21/10 – 4/11 15 $750 travel credit
Antarctic Peninsula – Basecamp Ortelius 4/11 – 15/11 12 Includes free activities
South Georgia In Depth 4/11 – 18/11 15 $750 travel credit
Falklands , South Georgia & Antarctica 6/11 – 25/11 20 Up to $4,000 off
Weddell Sea – In search of the Emperor Penguin 15/11 – 25/11 11 Up to €1,200 off
Falkland Islands – South Georgia – Antarctic Peninsula 29/11- 18/12 20 Up to €1,100 off
Antarctic Peninsula Explorer 4/12 – 14/12 11 $750 travel credit
Antarctic Peninsula with South Shetland Islands 6/12 – 16/12 11 Up to €850 off
Antarctic Peninsula with South Shetland Islands 6/12 – 16/12 11 Up to €850 off
Antarctic Peninsula 14/12 – 25/12 12 $1,000 off
Antarctic Peninsula Adventure 3/3 – 13/3 11 $750 travel credit
Marine Mammals of Antarctica 23/3 – 2/4 11 $750 travel credit

To discuss your Antarctic travel plans or book your cruise, contact one of our experts at +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or message us here.

RELATED: Bucket list worthy things to do in the Antarctic

5 amazing places you’ll visit on an Antarctic cruise

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Antarctica, the last true wilderness on the planet. A vast, unspoiled continent that has been inspiring adventurers for hundreds of years. Access to parts of the Antarctic have become much easier in recent years and unlike Shackleton’s exploration, it can be done so in relevant comfort. Here’s 5 amazing regions you’re likely to visit on an Antarctic cruise.

Ushuaia & Tierra del Fuego

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Ushuaia is referred to as ‘The End of the World’ and though it feels like it, it’s the starting point for almost all expeditions to the white continent. Surrounding the most southerly town in the world are snowcapped mountains and the Beagle Channel. While most people land in the town and head straight off, it’s worth taking some time to explore. Hike along the trails with local guides, go trout fishing in the lakes, horse ride and take cross country skiing tours. The Tierra del Fuego National Park is home to much wildlife and is breathtaking.

Weddell Sea & Snow Hill

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The Weddell sea is a truly extraordinary place. To visit, one must travel on board an ice-breaker vessel which cuts through thick ice floes. This is a place where few have been before. Snow Hill is home to one of the only emperor penguin rookeries. Some vessels have helicopters to help you get a bird’s eye view and land nearby to walk among the colony. Here, the male penguins have survived the winter with little food while keeping the eggs of their young warm below their feet. An awesome site. Out at sea, Weddell seals can be seen basking on the chunks of floating ice or diving into the water in search of their next meal.

South Georgia

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Many of the Antarctic expeditions visit South Georgia, a place perhaps best known as the resting place or the explorer Shackleton. What fewer know is South Georgia is one of the most awe inspiring places on the planet. Rich with wildlife, thousands of penguins can be found along the Salisbury Plain while many more Gentoo penguins and huge elephant seals take up the beach along Gold Harbour. It’s also an excellent place for seeing wandering albatrosses and fur seals. Though the waters nearby can be rough, it’s sometimes possible to visit Elephant Island where Shackleton’s crew were stranded all those years ago.

Falkland Islands

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Another common stop off point on the way to the Antarctic, and for good reason. The Falkland Islands, located around 300 miles east of South America, is home to much wildlife. Similar to the windswept islands of Scotland, there are more than 200 recorded species of birds on the archipelago. Magellan and  Gentoo penguins on Carcass Island, and rockhoppers, blue-eyed shags and black-browed albatrosses nest on West Point. The islands are the perfect breeding ground for elephant and fur seals who crowd the beaches.

Antarctic Peninsula and Circle

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One of the most magically moments for most is the first sightings of icebergs during the approach to the Antarctic Peninsula. The huge towering monoliths of all shapes and sizes slowly float past before waterways and mountains surround the vessel from all sides. An expedition is likely to take you down Antarctic Sound (sometimes called Iceberg Alley) and through the stunning Lemaire Channel.  Look out for leopard and crabeater seals basking in the soon and humpback and minke whales fluking near the ship.

The next Antarctic expedition season starts in November 2017, but the limited spaces get booked up fast. To start planning your once-in-a-lifetime cruise to the white continent, contact one of our experts at +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or send us a message.

RELATED: Bucket list worthy things to do in the Antarctic

8 incredible things you’ll do on a cruise in the Galapagos Islands

The Galapagos Islands is arguably one of the finest wildlife spots in the world. With a high proportion of endemic creatures, this was famously the archipelago that Charles Darwin came up with his theory of evolution. It may not be known as much for its human history, but the tales of whalers, buccaneers and mysterious early settlers are just as fascinating.

Here we’ll run through 8 of the best things you will do on an 8-day cruise with us in the Galapagos. Would you like to walk with giant Galapagos tortoises in the wild or swim in the swallows with playful sea lion pups? Take a look at our list of Galapagos cruises and get booking today.

Snorkel with turtles

What could be better than donning a snorkelling mask and swimming with the warm clear waters alongside graceful turtles in the wild? These beautiful creatures live here in abundance, and with snorkelling opportunities every day on most of our cruises, you’ll be sure to spot plenty of them. Silently glide alongside these fearless marine creatures as they search for food.

Walk along the red beach of Rabida

The Galapagos never ceases to amaze in its diversity. On Rabida, a small central island near Santiago, the beaches are deep red, almost maroon coloured. Why? The high content of iron in the rock oxides, making it effectively go rusty. This doesn’t stop the wildlife of which you can see species aplenty. A colony of noisy sea lions bask along the beach, marine iguanas lounge, while brown pelicans and blue-footed boobies build their nest.

Watch the mating dance of the waved albatross

This one’s not only specific to the Galapagos Islands, it’s specific to one island, Española. During April and May the waved albatross return to the island to find a mate. Their curious mating dance of bill clapping, circling and sky pointing. We were lucky enough to see the display close up, a film of which you can see above.

See golden rays in Black Turtle Cove

One of our favourites. The mangroves of Black Turtle Cove are often done on the last morning before departing. Zip down through the secluded estuary on Santa Cruz Island on board dinghies at turn of the engines, after which the real magic begins. Turtles rise to the surface to breath and white tipped reef sharks dart past. However, the real highlight is the schools of golden rays, seen just under the water’s surface.

Post a letter a Post Office Bay

The Galapagos may be known for its wildlife, but humans have also made their mark. Whalers used Floreana Island as a stop off point since the early 19th century. Here they left a wooden barrel at the now named Post Office Bay, from which mail could be left and collected by passersby. When you visit, be sure to leave your piece of mail, and collect some unstamped mail to deliver or hand deliver on your return.

See marine life at the Devil’s Crown

The Devil’s Crown is perhaps the best dive site on the archipelago. The sunken volcanic crater, eroded by waves over thousands of years, is inhabited by a coral reef. This along with the currents, make an ideal home for marine life. Snorkellers are treated to the sight of colourful tropical fish, turtles, marine iguanas and small sharks. If you are a beginner, be sure to stay within the crown, as hammerheads often circle around the outside.

Walk with giant Galapagos tortoises

The iconic giant Galapagos tortoises (of which there are several species), are what gave the archipelago its name. Famously, the islands were home to lonesome George, the last of his species found alone on Pinta Island. He died in 2012, but it’s still possible to go to the highlands of Santa Cruz and walk, albeit slowly, with these gentle giants.

Take a dingy around Kicker Rock

Its Spanish name is Leon Dormido, which literally translates to ‘Sleeping Lion’, an apt name for the two rocky outcrops in the south east of the archipelago. Take a dingy through the narrow channel where an incredible variety of wildlife can be seen. On the cliffs above, nesting blue-footed boobies and frigatebirds can be seen.

Has this whetted the appetite for the Galapagos and the spectacular wildlife that can be seem? If you have any questions about visiting the islands or would like some advice on booking, get in touch with us today or have a look at our Galapagos tour suggestions.

RELATED: A typical day in the Galapagos Islands

Wildlife Hotspots In The Antarctic

Flickr: Aah-Yeah

Flickr: Aah-Yeah

Drake Passage

The rough seas of the Drake Passage that connect the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans is most people’s first experience with the harsh climates of the Antarctic region. Although some decide to fly down to the Antarctic, skipping the Drake Passage, those who take the two day voyage are treated to an array of sea birds including giant storm petrels, black browed albatross and sometimes even roaming albatross. Sightings of whales and dolphins are common.

Suggested cruise: Classic Antarctica on board the Ocean Nova

Weddell Sea

For true exploration of the Antarctic an ice-breaking voyage through the Weddell Sea is a must. This pristine wilderness is often clogged with pack-ice so a stronger ice-class vessel is required. This is one of the best places to view whales including killer whales, humpback whales and minke whales. Leopard seals, weddell seals and crabeater seals can often be seen basking on the pack-ice or fishing. Adelie penguins have adapted for the harsh conditions and a colony of a hundred thousand can be seen on Paulet Island. Not long ago an emperor penguin colony was found on Snowhill Island.

Suggested cruise: Weddell Sea Quest on board the M/V Ushuaia

 

Falkland Islands

Disputed archipelago located 400 kms from the Tierra del Fuego in southern Argentina and a wildlife enthusiasts perfect location. There are plenty of bird species including King penguins, Gentoo penguin, rockhopper penguin, macaroni penguin, Magellanic penguin, grebes, herons, ducks, hawks and more. In the waters around the archipelago elephant seals, fur seals, sealions and plenty of species of whale and dolphin can be spotted.

Suggested cruise: Crossing the Circle via Falklands on board the Sea Adventurer

South Georgia

This remote mountainous island located between the southern tip of Argentina and the Antarctic Penisula is packed full of glaciers and fjords. Wildlife highlights include albatrosses, skuas, gulls, ducks, teals, petrels, shearwaters, chinstrap penguins and Gentoo penguins. The stars of the show are the 400,000 pairs of king penguins and the two million pairs of macaroni penguins. The island has a fascinating history of whalers and Shackleton’s Endurance expedition.

Suggested cruise: South Georgia In Depth on board the Akademik Sergey

 

Flickr: Liam Quinn

Flickr: Liam Quinn

South Orkney Islands

This archipelago of four rugged islands located around 800 miles north of the Antarctic Peninsula is mainly used as a research base for the British and Argentines. The climate here is particularly harsh with strong winds, rain and snow falls almost every day of the year. Coronation Island is an excellent place to observe the elusive pure white snow petrel which uses the island for breeding. Bird species include skues, cormorants, sheathbills and terns as well as Adelie, chinstrap and Gentoo penguins. Colonies of fur seals are found on some of the islands’ beaches.

Suggested cruise: Falklands, South Georgia and Antarctic Peninsula on board the M/V Ortelius

 

Flickr: Anne Dirkse

Flickr: Anne Dirkse

South Sandwich Islands

The South Sandwich Islands located 500 miles from South Georgia is a series of 11 volcanic islands, some of which are still active. The archipelago of islands extends for almost 250 miles and are connected to Tierra del Fuego by the Scotia Ridge, a sub-oceanic ridge. Although there used to be an Argentine research base here, it is now uninhabited. Few cruises visit the islands, but those who do find an impressive collection of wildlife including southern giant petrels, elephant seals, fur seals and Gentoo penguins. The highlight is the million or so pairs of chinstrap penguins.

Suggested cruise: Falklands, South Georgia & South Sandwich on board the M/V Plancius

 

Flickr: Liam Quinn

Flickr: Liam Quinn

South Shetland Islands

The South Shetlands Islands are relatively close to the Antarctic Peninsula, around 80 miles north. This is a common stopping point for reaching the white continent. This series of islands are almost completely covered with ice throughout the year. Its rich in wildlife including plenty of bird life, seals, whales and penguins. Elephant Island is the infamous place where Shackleton’s Endurance expedition got stranded in 1915 in heavy pack-ice. Many visit Deception Island where is it possible to swim in Pendulum Cove which is heated by volcanic activity.

Suggested cruise: Antarctic Circle Voyage on board the Akamedik Ioffe

Antarctic Peninsula

For most, the goal is to step onto the 7th continent which is easiest done on the Antarctic Peninsula. However, due to the harsher climate the wildlife spotting opportunities are not as varied as the sub-polar islands north of the peninsula. You will find seals, sea birds and some whales. For those who have more time (and a higher budget), the highlight will surely be walking near to a vast emperor penguin colony which can only be reached by helicopter.

Suggested cruise: Antarctic Peninsula – Basecamp Ortelius on board the M/V Ortelius

We have a huge selection of Antarctic cruises on offer. For more details or to book your place for the upcoming 2015-2016 season get in touch.

RELATED: Bucket list worthy things to do in the Antarctic

6 Penguins That You Will See On An Antarctic Cruise

With the Antarctic cruise season almost upon us we will be producing a series of articles about the wildlife and landscapes of this incredible region.

Out of the seventeen species of penguin on earth, only two actually survive in the inhospitable conditions of the Antarctic. Most other species live either on the Antarctic Peninsula or the Southern Hemisphere islands like South Georgia. There are around seven species that you are likely to see on an Antarctic cruise.

The Emperor Penguin

Perhaps the most famous of the penguin species, the Emperor are the largest of the all penguins. They also breed the further south, forming huge colonies on the sea ice that surrounds the continent. For a species which breeds in the harshest conditions they also have the highest survival rate standing at 95% and can live up to 20 years. Interestingly, some never actually set foot on the continent, preferring to live and breed on the frozen sea.

The Chinstrap Penguin

The Chinstrap Penguin is found in the South Georgia Islands, the Antarctic Peninsula, South Shetland, South Orkneys and more. Their name comes from the black line below their heads which make them appear to be wearing a black helmet. They are common with an estimated eight million pairs, found in colonies of over 100,000 at a time. Chinstrap penguins return to the same nesting site each year to mate with the same partner.

Flickr: Chadica

Flickr: Chadica

The Adélie Penguin

The Adélie penguin is the only penguin species along with the Emperor penguin which lives on the Antarctic with rookeries found all along the Antarctic coastline. They are named after Adélie Pepin, the wife of Jules Dumont d’Urville, the French explorer who discovered the penguins in 1840. They are some of the smallest penguins and can dive up to one hundred and seventy metres to catch their food.

The Gentoo Penguin

The Gentoo penguin is closely related to the Adélie and the chinstrap. They can be distingused from the other species by the wide stripe across the top of their heads and their bright orange bill. They also have the most prominent of tails of all the penguin species. As the penguin moves on land it sticks this tail out moving it from side-to-side which gave it its scientific name – Pygoscelis meaning rump-tailed. They don’t form the same size colonies as other species tending to stick together in smaller groups.

Flickr: Liam Quinn

Flickr: Liam Quinn

The King Penguin

The King penguin is the second largest species after the Emperor which it is closely related. They can often reach a metre tall and weigh up to 16 kgs. They are mostly found on the Subantarctic island of South Georgia and do not live on the continent itself. The King penguins are excellent divers often reaching one hundred metres, although records show depths of over three hundred.

Flickr: Liam Quinn

Flickr: Liam Quinn

The Macaroni Penguin

The name of the Macaroni are found are mostly found on the Subantarctic islands, although one colony is found on the Antarctic Peninsula. Expects estimate there are around eighteen million individuals making it one of the largest species, although sadly there numbers are shrinking. They are a small, around 70 cms in length and have a distinct feature is the yellow crest that extends back from the centre of their forehead. Interesting the Macaroni penguin always lays two eggs, one slightly smaller than the other. However, the small egg almost never produces a chick, only hatching if the larger of the two is lost.

To see all of these penguin species and the amazing world that they inhabit, why not visit them on an Antarctic cruise. To view all 2015/16 cruises along with prices visit out Antarctic cruise list.

RELATED: Bucket list worthy things to do in the Antarctic

Buy one get one free on Antarctic Cruises

Ocean Diamond Copyright (CIP)Our Antarctic Cruise Sale begins today and will run until Friday 26 September. There are 8 voyages on a buy-one-get-one-free promotion so if you’re thinking of going to the Antarctic this year its the perfect time to book your cruise.

Antarctic Explorer: Discovering the 7th Continent
Sea Spirit – 7 November 2014
Sea Adventurer – 16 November 2014
Sea Adventurer – 26 November 2014
Ocean Diamond – 2 December 2014
Sea Adventurer – 6 November 2014
Ocean Diamond – 11 December 2014

Falklands, South Georgia & Antarctica: Explorers and Kings
Ocean Diamond – 14 November 2014
Sea Spirit – 17 November 2014

Call us on +44 (0) 207 407 1478 or email for more details on the itinerary and pricing.

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